gossip

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gossip about (someone or something)

To speak about someone or something in a hurtful or spiteful manner. Those popular girls are always gossiping about someone in our class. Oh please, I know you're the one who gossiped about me and started those awful rumors!
See also: gossip

gossip about someone or something

to talk maliciously about someone or something. Who are you gossiping about now? They are gossiping about what happened last weekend.
See also: gossip
References in periodicals archive ?
"With that definition, it would be hard to think of a person who never gossips because that would mean the only time they mention someone is in their presence.
People may, in fact, feel more comfortable offering information about themselves than being perceived as gossips.
Gossips in the workplace occur not only in the cafeteria during lunch or coffee breaks, in the locker or washrooms, but also in the office cubicles during working time.
Gossips could also pose problems for team managers.
Gossips are often associated with those who breach trust and confidence.
Inevitably however, "off the record" so to speak, the boss gossips just as much about the workers as they gossip about him.
In its depiction of three female gossips surrounded by devils (one of them the recording demon, Tutivillus), Transforming Talk's cover illustration, from a fourteenth-century tracery light in Stanford-on-Avon Church, Northamptonshire, is the visual form of the book's basic premise, that 'idle talk and pastoral rhetoric are deeply intertwined' (p.
More than one in three of those questioned said they had heard someone talking about them behind their back and some had a working relationship ruined by office gossips.
SACKING office gossips USstyle has not yet crossed the Atlantic - but could spread alarm in bully-boy workplaces, say Birmingham business experts.
We also reckon chat show hosts Richard and Judy are the biggest celebrity gossips - although interestingly, they're rarely the subject of gossip themselves.
If the talk is about something visual, such as weight loss or change of appearance, Susan advises that you bring up the subject in front of the gossips. "Go and say, `You're right, I've had my face lifted but I'm still faithful to my husband'.
If the talk is about something visual, such as weight loss or change of appearance, Susan advises that you bring up the subject in front of the gossips. ``Go and say, `You're right, I've had my face lifted but I'm still faithful to my husband'.
(33) But he added, "Other neighbours take the side of my wife because she gossips freely with them whereas Mrs Hall minds her own business." While the wives wanted to keep Mrs.
The days of managers and bosses coming down hard on office gossips seem to be behind us.
Forget the assumption that women are the biggest gossips - a new survey out yesterday concludes men are by far the worst culprits.