gospel


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Related to gospel: gospel music, bible

take (something) for gospel

To believe that something is absolutely true without any hesitation or reservations. When we're growing up, we take what our parents tell us for gospel. That's part of why teenagers are so rebellious, because they're just starting to realize their parents' fallibility. The beloved professor's opinions on the author are taken for gospel by his students.
See also: gospel, take

accept (something) as gospel

To believe that something is absolutely true without any hesitation or reservations. When we're growing up, we accept what our parents tell us as gospel. The beloved professor's opinions on the subject are accepted as gospel by his students.
See also: accept, gospel

take (something) as gospel

To believe that something is absolutely true without any hesitation or reservations. When we're growing up, we take what our parents tell us as gospel. That's part of why teenagers are so rebellious, because they're just starting to realize their parents' fallibility. The beloved professor's opinions on the author are taken as gospel by his students.
See also: gospel, take

the gospel truth

Definitely true or accurate. I was home all night, and that's the gospel truth—mom can confirm it.
See also: gospel, truth

(the) gospel truth

Fig. the undeniable truth. The witness swore he was telling the gospel truth. I told my parents the gospel truth about how the vase broke.
See also: gospel, truth

gospel truth

Something that is unquestionably true. For example, Every word he uttered was the gospel truth. The word gospel, which comes from the Old English god spel, "good news," has been used to describe something that is thought to be as true as the biblical gospel (that is, undeniably true) since the 13th century. The current idiom originated in the 1600s, when it referred to biblical truths, and has been applied to truth of a more general nature since the late 1800s. Also see take as gospel.
See also: gospel, truth

take as gospel

Also, take for gospel. Believe absolutely, regard as true, as in We took every word of his as gospel, but in fact he was often mistaken. This idiom, first recorded in 1496, uses gospel in the sense of the absolute truth. Also see gospel truth.
See also: gospel, take

take something as gospel

or

take something as the gospel truth

If you take something as gospel or take it as the gospel truth, you accept it as being completely true, especially when it is not. You will read a lot of advice in books and magazines but you shouldn't take it all as gospel. Too many people take what he says as gospel. Note: You can also accept something as gospel or accept something as the gospel truth. For some reason, people are willing to accept as gospel these ridiculous claims. Here, their opinions are accepted as the gospel truth. Note: If you say that something is the gospel truth, you mean that it is completely true. When people ask me how old I am, and I say I don't know, they think I'm lying. But it's the gospel truth. Note: In the Christian religion, the gospel is the message and teachings of Jesus Christ. The four books of the Bible which describe His life and teachings are called the Gospels.
See also: gospel, something, take

gospel truth

the absolute truth. informal
1998 Mirror Any research that puts down men is accepted as gospel truth these days.
See also: gospel, truth

take something as/for ˈgospel/ˌgospel ˈtruth

(informal) believe something without questioning it or without any real proof: You can’t always take what she says as gospel — she’s not the most honest person in the world.It would be foolish to take everything in the newspapers for gospel. OPPOSITE: take something with a pinch of salt
Gospel is the life and teaching of Jesus as described in the Bible.
See also: gospel, something, take, truth

gospel (truth)

n. the honest truth. You gotta believe me. It’s the gospel truth!
See also: gospel, truth

gospel

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
This introduction is not intended for the scholars of the Synoptic Gospels but for interested students and lay people.
While each of these styles has its own distinct performance practices, three major components define all the styles as black gospel music: sound, style, and spirit.
com &Liverpool Lighthouse Saturday, June 7: City Sings Gospel International Concert Liverpool Lighthouse - 7pm, pounds 5 The finale of the International GospelArts Partnership Summit will be an International Gospel Arts Showcase concert featuring Gospel Artists from Africa, Europe, UK and the USA.
I am not here establishing a semantic trap whereby even the denial of the gospel constitutes acceptance, so that once again there is no meaningful way for a stubborn minority to either say yes or no.
Uncloudy Days: The Gospel Music Encyclopedia contains more than 100 interviews that reveal many of these stories for the first time.
Contemporary Gospel music was born during the "black pride" movement of the 1970s and the release of Walter Hawkin's arrangement of the hymn "O Happy Day.
And that new level is not only issuing a new call to lost souls, but also a new response from those inside and outside of the traditional gospel industry.
It is time for us to realize the gospel, and to consider upon what terms we took up profession, and what the cross of Christ means.
Many of the essays in this book were first presented as papers at conferences on the Social Gospel at the Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School or at the American Society of Church History.
A New History of Black Gospel Music by Robert Darden Continuum International Publishing Group October 2004, $24.
GOSPEL music can really trace its roots to the late 19th and early 20th century American musicians.
This much is known: The Gospel of Mark was written 68-70 A.
Mitchell wrote this for young people, basing it on his book for adults, The Gospel According to Jesus, which came out about 10 years ago.
Author James Goff's Close Harmony: A History of Southern Gospel is an important contribution to the scant scholarly literature on the subject of gospel music and is one of two fine books published on the subject in 2002.
This was certainly true for Forrest, who not only used music as theme and metaphor throughout his fiction but whose development as a writer was admittedly influenced by black music in general, and Mahalia Jackson's gospel music in particular.