gorge

(redirected from gorger)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to gorger: cringing, Gypsy, frazzled, romping, howk, stank
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

(one's) gorge rises (at something)

One is disgusted or sickened (by something). The "gorge" is the stomach; the phrase comes from Shakespeare's Hamlet. I could never be a doctor. Blood, vomit, open wounds—my gorge rises at all that kind of stuff. Her gorge rose listening to the senator's weak public apology following the scandal.
See also: gorge, rise

cast the gorge at (something)

To spurn or decline something with anger or disgust. You should surely cast the gorge at participating in such corruption.
See also: cast, gorge

gorge on (something)

To eat something eagerly and usually to excess. A reflexive pronoun can be used between "gorge" and "on." I didn't mean to gorge myself on cake at the party—it was just so good! If the kids gorge on snacks now, they won't be hungry for dinner.
See also: gorge, on

gorge with (something)

1. To eat something eagerly and usually to excess. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun can be used between "gorge" and "with." I didn't mean to gorge myself on cake at the party—it was just so good!
2. To provide someone with something to a great degree, typically food and drink. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "gorge" and "with." The caterers really gorged us on some fine food and drink at the gala. We need to gorge this guy with the finer points of our program so he'll come work here.
3. To ornament with something, typically something that can be embedded. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "gorge" and "with." Did you see the princess's engagement ring? It's gorged with all kinds of jewels.
See also: gorge

make (one's) gorge rise

To make one feel disgusted or sickened. The "gorge" is the stomach; the phrase comes from Shakespeare's Hamlet. I could never be a doctor. Blood, vomit, open wounds—all that stuff makes my gorge rise. Just hearing him try to shift the blame onto the victims of the crime made her gorge rise.
See also: gorge, make, rise

the gorge rises at it

One is disgusted or sickened by something. (The "gorge" is the stomach.) The phrase appears in Shakespeare's Hamlet. I could never be a doctor. Blood, vomit, open wounds—the gorge rises at it.
See also: gorge, rise

feel one's gorge rise

Fig. to sense that one is getting very angry. I felt my gorge rise and I knew I was going to lose my temper. Bob could feel his gorge rise as he read his tax bill.
See also: feel, gorge, rise

gorge oneself on something

 and gorge oneself with something
to eat something to the point of fullness. Don't gorge yourself on the snacks. Dinner is in ten minutes. You have gorged yourself with cheese! No wonder you're not hungry. Claire gorged herself on the doughnuts that Fred bought.
See also: gorge, on

gorge someone or something with something

to fill someone or something by eating something. She gorged the dog with canned food. The puppy gorged itself with all the hamburger Paul had set out to thaw.
See also: gorge

make someone's gorge rise

Fig. to cause someone to become very angry. The unnecessary accident made my gorge rise. Getting his tax bill made Bob's gorge rise.
See also: gorge, make, rise

cast the gorge at

reject with loathing. dated
See also: cast, gorge

your gorge rises

you are sickened or disgusted.
Gorge is an obsolete term from falconry, meaning ‘a meal for a hawk’; from this derives the more general sense of ‘the contents of the stomach’.
See also: gorge, rise

gorge on

v.
To eat enthusiastically and in great amounts: He gorged on pizza. She gorged herself on junk food.
See also: gorge, on

gorge with

v.
1. To embed something or someone with some object or decoration: The king's crown was gorged with diamonds.
2. To indulge something or someone, especially with food or drink: The hosts gorged the weary travelers with delicacies of every kind. The hotel guests were gorged with hospitality.
3. To eat enthusiastically and in great amounts. Used reflexively: They gorged themselves with ice cream.
See also: gorge
References in periodicals archive ?
As has been noted by others, Urs Fischer is one of the latter, among those for whom the real and existing world in all its gross, heterogeneous profusion is an endless source of nourishment, and he descends from a line of likewise prodigious gorgers, all of whom also appear in his output.
The goodtime gorgers spending too much then stumbling into the night with a deadly deficit in the wallet.
I felt like one of them (gorgers or goyim, take your pick) watching us, and what I discovered on the other side was surprising: that curiosity is not the same thing as hostility; that incomprehension or even disapproval does not preclude empathy; and, perhaps most clearly, the disturbing symbiosis that often occurs between persecutor and persecuted.
In general, cats are grazers, unlike dogs, who tend to be gorgers. Mini-meals, say in the morning, when you return from work and before bedtime can also help maximize your cat's metabolism.
In general, dogs tend to be gorgers, but you can maximize their metabolism by feeding them a meal in the morning and one in the evening rather than one big meal a day.
Perhaps us 'gorgers', as I understand settled people are known by the travelling community, should consider the Biblical aphorism: "Let he who is far from bins cast the first stone".
There is pasta aplenty, but much else for gourmets and gorgers to choose from, whether in the spacious dining room or self-service restaurant.
It's quite an extensive menu and the great thing about this food is that it caters for meat gorgers and vegetarian nibblers just about equally.