good omen

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good omen

A sign, either real or imagined, of good fortune or a propitious outcome. I saw a dove on my windowsill this morning; I'd say it's a good omen for the rest of my day. I think the way our conversation ended is a good omen for where our relationship is headed.
See also: good, omen
References in classic literature ?
A CROW was jealous of the Raven, because he was considered a bird of good omen and always attracted the attention of men, who noted by his flight the good or evil course of future events.
the sandwiches and sherry brought me a dream that I could not but consider of good omen. And this was the dream.
THAT did ye devise when with me, that do I take as a good omen,--such things only the convalescents devise!
As she rolled away, the sun came out, and looking back, she saw it shining on the group at the gate like a good omen. They saw it also, and smiled and waved their hands, and the last thing she beheld as she turned the corner was the four bright faces, and behind them like a bodyguard, old Mr.
The old figure stirred me as it had never done before and seemed a good omen for the winter.
they are always flying in thy wake; birds of good omen, too, but not to all; --look here, they burn; but thou--thou liv'st among them without a scorch.
This was considered a good omen, and little short of miraculous.
The agreeable character of the trip by sea was regarded as a good omen of the probable issue of the trip through the air.
Telemachus took this speech as of good omen and rose at once, for he was bursting with what he had to say.
When I went back on the morrow the little maidservant conducted me straight through the long sala(it opened there as before in perfect perspective and was lighter now, which I thought a good omen) into the apartment from which the recipient of my former visit had emerged on that occasion.
"Thanks to thee, Mopo, it is a good omen," he answered.
Then we all laughed and took it for a good omen. Umbopa was a cheerful savage, in a dignified sort of way, when he was not suffering from one of his fits of brooding, and he had a wonderful knack of keeping up our spirits.
It is a good omen for youth, and hope, and beauty when they find themselves in this place, and don't know what's to come of it."
"Oh, I am listening with the greatest impatience," replied the young man; "speak, I beg of you." Valentine cast down her eyes; this was a good omen for Morrel, for he knew that nothing but happiness could have the power of thus overcoming Valentine.
Partridge was in very high spirits during the whole way, and often mentioned to Jones the many good omens of his future success which had lately befriended him; and which the reader, without being the least superstitious, must allow to have been particularly fortunate.