good graces, to be/get in one's

good graces, to be/get in one's

To insinuate oneself into favor, to ingratiate oneself. “Good graces” has meant the condition or act of being favored since the fifteenth century and appears throughout English literature. The seventeenth-century diarist John Evelyn wrote (Memoirs, 1675), “A sprightly young lady much in the good graces of the family.”
See also: get, good