gone with the wind


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gone with the wind

A phrase used to describe something that has disappeared, passed, or vanished, permanently or completely. The phrase was popularized by Margaret Mitchell's 1936 novel of the same name. Oh, that project was gone with the wind once the CEO voiced his concerns about it.
See also: gone, wind

gone with the wind

Fig. gone as if taken away by the wind. (A phrase made famous by the Margaret Mitchell novel and subsequent film Gone with the Wind. The phrase is used to make gone have a stronger force.) Everything we worked for was gone with the wind.
See also: gone, wind

gone with the wind

Disappeared, gone forever, as in With these unforeseen expenses, our profits are gone with the wind. This phrase became famous as the title of Margaret Mitchell's 1936 novel, which alludes to the Civil War's causing the disappearance of a Southern way of life. It mainly serves as an intensifier of gone.
See also: gone, wind

gone with the wind

If something has gone with the wind, it has disappeared forever. There will be more promises, and the promises of the previous year will have gone with the wind. Note: `Gone With the Wind' is the title of a 1936 novel about the American Civil War. It deals with the fact that the war completely changed the way of life in the South.
See also: gone, wind

gone with the wind

gone completely; having disappeared without trace.
This expression comes from Ernest Dowson 's poem ‘Cynara’ ( 1896 ): ‘I have forgot much, Cynara, gone with the wind’, but it is best known as the title of Margaret Mitchell's 1936 novel about the American Civil War.
See also: gone, wind
References in periodicals archive ?
Just as Gone with the Wind is set during the American Civil War, World War II gradually closes in on Darwin as Australia's narrative progresses.
However, while most audiences and readers are very familiar with Gone With the Wind and The Wizard of Oz, Adams' other choices, such as The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn were, as Adams acknowledges, not as celebrated as the first two.
Good news for movie buffs in the UAE is that Gone with the Wind is appearing in movie theatres in Dubai and Abu Dhabi.
I've never made the same thing twice and it probably sounds not that interesting - but I did enjoy it," she said as Gone With The Wind was unveiled, proving that some things that get blown away do actually come back.
As Gone With The Wind sold 50,000 copies a day in New York alone, Margaret Mitchell was compared with Tolstoy, Thomas Hardy and Charles Dickens.
Gone With The Wind was showing in the Coliseum in Canton.
Using Gone With the Wind, which I believe is one of the most watched films, I'm referencing and playing with the fact that if a person has seen the film it already exists in their mind.
Gone With The Wind finished tailed off in all her five starts.
The recipient of eight Oscars in all, Gone With The Wind was made back in 1939 - about the same time that Hitler was invading the rest of Europe.
Think what a number the Civil War and interpersonal neuroses do on Scarlett and Rhett in Gone With the Wind, just as homophobia does on the erotic trio in Sunday Bloody Sunday and racism on the housewife and the gardener in Far From Heaven.
BOTTOM-numbing movie classic Gone With The Wind has been voted the greatest epic of all time.
Viewers will have to tune in to see quite what plots that represent Lord of the Rings, Birdsong, Gone with the Wind, The Shell Seekers and Lord of the Flies look like.
SIR - Reading your article ``Greatest cinema one-liners (March 10) brought back memories for me with the second most popular one-liner from the 1939 film Gone With The Wind (``Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn'').
And so was born the myth of the "Lost Cause," popularized in the movies Birth of a Nation and Gone With the Wind.
In this country a sequel to Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind was tied up in court earlier this year while judges decided if The Wind Done Gone violated copyright laws.