go public

(redirected from gone public)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

go public

1. To publicize or reveal something. When do you guys plan to go public with your relationship?
2. To become a publicly traded company (which requires issuing shares of stock for sale). That company stands to make a lot of money from going public.
See also: go, public
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

go public

 (with something)
1. to sell to the public shares of a privately owned company. (Securities markets.) The company decided not to go public because the economy was so bad at the time. Well go public at a later time.
2. to reveal something to the public. It's too early to go public with the story. Just let me know when we can go public with this press release.
See also: go, public
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

go public

Become a publicly held company, that is, issue ownership shares in the form of stock. For example, As soon as the company grows a little bigger and begins to show a profit, we intend to go public . [Mid-1900s]
See also: go, public
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

go public

COMMON
1. If you go public, you make something known to a lot of people, especially through the TV, newspapers, etc. Railtrack and the government went public with their plans for the west coast main line. Several ministers went public to deny the claims.
2. If a company goes public, it stops being privately owned, and people can buy shares in it. On May 14, Rambus, a microchip maker, went public.
See also: go, public
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

go public

1 become a public company. 2 reveal details about a previously private concern.
See also: go, public
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

go ˈpublic


1 (of a company) sell shares to the public: We’re hoping to go public early next year.
2 make a public statement about a private matter because you think this is the right thing to do: He decided to go public about his drug problem in order to warn other athletes of the dangers.
See also: go, public
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

go public

1. in. to sell to the public shares of a privately owned company. (Securities markets.) We’ll go public at a later time.
2. in. to reveal something to the public. (Especially with with, as in the examples.) Just let me know when we can go public with this.
See also: go, public
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the pro-life movement has gone public with the truth, the number of medical training centers that teach abortion procedures has decreased by almost half.
But with hundreds of mainstream Internet businesses already having inked major deals for financing, grown, gone public, and made a killing--and with scores of others falling flat under the weight of expectations--the real question is why these gay-oriented companies are so late to the game and if they are really ready to go public.
In 1992, about a year after the company had gone public, management discovered that a group of technicians in an Oklahoma plant had been fudging data a little to make it look as if the company were doing a better job with pollution control than it was, in fact, doing.
"I talked to other CFOs whose companies had just gone public, so I didn't walk into the IPO process with blinders on.
I talked to people who have gone public and they can't stand it because of the scrutiny." One home builder, Nathan Shapell, went public and then bought his company back because he didn't like being in the limelight.
He is describing a chain of events-certainly more tumbling-forward than cunningly strategized-that has made him the Forest Service's major (and probably only) gone public advocate for change from within.