go in

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go in

1. Literally, to enter some place. Everyone stood outside chatting for a while before going in. We should probably go in soon. It's starting to get dark.
2. Of the sun, moon, or stars, to become obscured by clouds. It looked like it was going to be a beautiful day, but the sun went in as soon as we got set up for our picnic. We had been relying on the light of the moon to find our way, so we were left in total darkness after it went in.
3. To enter some place or situation with force or determination in order to accomplish something. Police officers have surrounded the building, waiting for a signal from the chief before going in. A: "Is the project still behind schedule?" B: "Yes, but the new technical manager will be going in to get things back on track."
4. To visit some specific place for a particular purpose. Yeah, I wound up canceling my appointment—my cold was so bad that I couldn't go in. I'm going in to meet with my professor this afternoon. I'm hoping he'll
5. To be kept in a certain place, thing, or area. The towels go in the linen closet.
6. To be an ingredient in or a component of something. I wonder what goes in this cake. She said it's healthy, but it's totally delicious!
7. To enter a part of someone's body during surgery. The doctors are going in to see if they can remove the tumor. The tendons are too damaged to heal on their own, so we'll need to go in and repair them.
8. Of information, to be understood or retained. I've already explained all of this to you, Tom. Is any of what I'm saying going in? Mark and I are pooling our money so we can go in on that new video game console together.
9. To fit into something. Nothing else can go in the closet right now, unless you want an avalanche the next time you open it. I really hope my belly will still go in my old suit!
10. To share ownership or enjoyment of something (with someone else) by contributing toward a portion of the cost. Usually followed by "on." Do you want to go in on a large pizza with me? Sorry, I don't have enough money to go in with you on that new video game.
See also: go
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

go in

1. Enter, especially into a building. For example, It's cold out here, so can we go in? [Tenth century a.d.]
2. Be obscured, as in After the sun went in, it got quite chilly. [Late 1800s]
3. go in with. Join others in some venture. For example, He went in with the others to buy her a present. [Late 1800s] Also see the subsequent idioms beginning with go in.
See also: go
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

go in

v.
1. To enter something: I went in the garage to find a rake. I went in, and there was Grandma, sitting on the sofa. It's too cold on the porch—let's go in. I walked to the pond and went in for a swim.
2. To enter through something: If the front door is locked, go in the back door.
3. To go to a central or particular location: I called the office and told them I wouldn't be going in today. The car has to go in for service. I went in for surgery.
4. To belong to or be easily accommodated by some place: These forks go in the bottom drawer. I tried this key on the lock, but it wouldn't go in.
5. To be an added ingredient of something: What kinds of spices go in this sauce?
6. To be learned or understood: I explained the procedure to the new mechanic many times, but it didn't go in.
7. To take part in a cooperative venture: I went in with my friends to buy a present for our new neighbors. He'll go in with them on the plan. Who wants to go in on a pizza with me?
See also: go
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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