go further

(redirected from gone further)

go further

1. To make a bolder statement about something being discussed; to say the thing that others have refused or been reluctant to say. I would go even further and say that he never loved you at all!
2. To stretch the quantity or amount of something. Make sure that each person only gets one ladle of soup—that'll make it go further.
See also: further, go

go ˈfurther


1 say more about something, or make a more extreme point about it: I would go even further and suggest that the entire government is corrupt.
2 last longer; serve more people: They watered down the soup to make it go further.
See also: further, go
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Clark confirmed he had gone further than the pilot scheme allowed when John Vine, the independent chief inspector of the UK Border Agency, raised concerns last week, she said.
Some states have gone further, enacting "augmented share" provisions that allow claims against assets outside the probate estate (such as lifetime gifts or inter virus trusts).
While I noted his caveat that "their design remains a bit of an uncertain art," I think he should have gone further to ensure that engineers do not immediately embrace constructed wetlands as a panacea for waste treatment and decontamination.
As Representative Don Bush, the resolution's sponsor, told Utah's Deseret Morning News, "We have gone further with this than anyone has before and further than anyone thought we would." He is convinced that "we succeeded in that we got the public interested and discussing it."
His non-diabetic companion stopped 70 metres short of the peak, because his condition was such that if he had gone further he would have imperilled both their lives, 'This was a great lesson,' says Peruffo.
Indeed, I wish Davis had gone further in her discussion here, perhaps tying together some of her ideas on the Reformation to her analysis of food and drink as a form of gift-exchange.
He has explored the importance of photography as a document, as a visual proof in Western society where "seeing is believing" and he has gone further to question what happens if what we see is not true.