golden

(redirected from goldenness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

golden

1. informal Of an exceptionally outstanding quality, character, or value. Tom's always been the golden child of our family. He seemingly can do no wrong in our parents' eyes. A: "Is there anything else you need done for this report?" B: "Nope, everything here is golden. Thanks, Sarah!"
2. slang Not at all in the wrong; perfectly fine. A: "I'm sorry about what happened, man." B: "Don't worry about it, bro. You're golden."
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

golden

mod. excellent; really cool. Look at the guy she is with. He is golden.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
However, if we read on a few stanzas, we find in the text a hint that the goodness of the new saeculum might have been read as depending precisely on its not experiencing the return of the golden race; and that what is at stake might be precisely the goldenness of the golden race.
In these lines are to be found both the nearest thing in the Carmen to an explicit allusion to the golden race and, at the same time, a second allusion which may be read as casting doubt on the desirability of a renascent golden race precisely on account of its goldenness.
Secondly, and relatedly, we are directed by blessed Plenty to an earlier Horatian treatment of abundance, in the first book of Epistles, and directed in turn by this treatment to think of the metaphorical goldenness of the golden race in association with the less desirable aspects of the physical metal, gold.
And the goldenness of Copia, in the context of the Epistle, is such as to render her morally dubious.
The fruges which golden Copia pours into Italy from her full horn may be as ambiguous as the fructus of the earlier part of the poem -- either the agricultural fruits, whether of Italy itself or of its empire, or, metaphorically, the luxurious spoils of the imperial successes Horace lists,(28) the mineral, monetary nature of which is reflected in the goldenness of the Plenty who pours them.
On the other hand, one might read Copia's goldlessness in the Carmen, in contrast to her goldenness in the Epistle, as being a guarantee of Copia's blessedness.
For goldenness as a sign of unblessedness, one need look only as far as Ovid's famous reworking of Propertius 3.