go toward (someone or something)

(redirected from going toward something)

go toward (someone or something)

1. To move forward or maneuver toward a location or goal The army went toward the enemy capital. Last time I saw them, they were going toward the library.
2. To be designated or used for a particular purpose. Typically said of money. My graduation money will go toward those car repairs I desperately need.
See also: go, toward

go toward someone or something

to move toward someone or something. The child went toward the open door. The dog went toward the cat and the cat ran away.
See also: go, toward
References in periodicals archive ?
Even chopping or washing is family time, made more special by the fact that all your work is going toward something you'll enjoy together.
But here you are going toward something with meaning, something of value and something that will redound to others' benefit.
"They see dollars that are going toward something that they also care about."
We're going toward something vast and great, which obviously he thinks is going to be God, and he calls God "ultimate truth, ultimate love, ultimate life," but it can't be confined in an image or a concept.
I was going toward something. That's the problem with words like "expatriate." The "ex" is the problem.
But I'm sitting on some goodies fight now that are going toward something.