go to trial

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go to trial

To cause a case to be tried in court. Considering the crimes that man's committed, he's definitely going to trial.
See also: go, trial
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

go to trial

[for a case] to go into court to be tried. When will this case go to trial? We go to trial next Monday.
See also: go, trial
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The chance of their case going to trial is incredibly slim.
However, not going to trial means she will be sent to jail for three years.
The difference in penalties between going to trial and taking a plea is tremendous.
Melbourne, June 1(ANI): Donald Bradman's son will have one last try at mediation before going to trial over exploitation of the cricket legend's name, the South Australian Supreme Court has been told.
From arbitration ("a procedure enabling opponents to scream bloody murder at each other before going to trial and being inhibited by the decorum imposed in court") to yard ("A plot of dirt, grass, flowers, trees, shrubs, weeds and the like which Americans keep in front or back of their house for use as a spouse, child and dog dumping ground, and also for the convenience of the neighbors' cats"), each entry is delicious with irony, subtext, wit, and scorn for the self-absorbed.
McMillan, a fraud examiner and CPA, advises a victimized company first to contact an independent CPA firm to assist with the investigation, insurance claims and going to trial, if necessary.
It's always been challenging, particularly for defense attorneys, to get their clients to understand what they're up against--and the fact that admitting you did something wrong might not be so bad, compared with going to trial. We've just seen that in the Enron cases, where the defendants spent something like $60 million on their defense, but now could be sentenced to lengthy prison terms.
But going to trial is dangerous because, "collectively, the total of claims is in the tens of millions of dollars and far exceeds the net worth of the diocese," said the bishop.
He expressed hope, however, that Libeskind and Silverstein would be able to reach a settlement before going to trial.
"I couldn't guarantee to him and his family that he would win." Riddet said it was not worth the risk of going to trial and ending up with a sentence of five years or more.
"What I believe is, if you don't have lawyers who are good at going to trial and the defense bar knows that, they will push for more lenient deals.
They had no concerns about going to trial - despite strong prosecution evidence at a preliminary hearing aiming to prove that Murray's gross negligence killed the King of Pop.