go into reverse

(redirected from going into reverse)

go into reverse

To move backward or in the opposite direction. I just worry that our store's sales will go into reverse once everyone reads that terrible review.
See also: go, reverse

go/put something into reˈverse

start to happen or make something happen in the opposite way: In the 1980s economic growth went into reverse.
See also: go, put, reverse, something
References in periodicals archive ?
Mike Hawes, chief executive of SMMT, said: "Another month of decline is worrying but the fact that sales of alternatively-fuelled cars are going into reverse is a grave concern."
A rattled DeChambeau shot a 75 to fall off the leaderboard after going into reverse on the back nine.
These figures make it clear that the UK's export drive is at risk of going into reverse gear, at the time when it needs to be moving forward."
Some signs were that it might even have been going into reverse.
Reverse gears ENGINEERING expert Tom Furness is going into reverse. Tom, 25, who completed his MSc degree in mechanical engineering at Huddersfield University and hails from the town, has landed a post as a Knowledge Transfer Partnership associate with Wetherby-based firm NTR Ltd, where he is working on a project to automate the process of repairing damaged tools - using a procedure known as reverse engineering ?
Uranus is going into reverse which might explain a lot.
SALES of cars in Europe have slowed down a gear, with the numbers of Jaguars and Land Rovers bought going into reverse.
A recall of 68,000 vehicles worldwide,including 14,000 in theUK, has been triggered by four reported instances of cars going into reverse by mistake.
Shop prices broke the seasonal pattern by going into reverse in August, said the British Retail Consortium.
Other research has shown that, apart from the US, we have fared worse for life expectancy among industrialised nations with the figures briefly going into reverse between 2014 and 2015.
Venus is going into reverse in your love sky, Taurus.
Evolution is "in danger of going into reverse" unless people start eating more oily fish, a nutrition expert claimed yesterday.
"If we don't go back to our fish-eating days, evolution is danger of going into reverse."
He said Manchester and Liverpool were the "engines that could transform the prospects" of the region but their schools performance was "going into reverse".
The uncomfortable truth is the NHS is going into reverse, spending failing to keep pace with advances in drugs and science, never mind an ageing population requiring more care.