go into effect

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go into effect

Of a law, policy, etc., to become official, legitimate, or valid. These changes in the uniform policy go into effect at the start of next year.
See also: effect, go

go into effect

 and take effect
[for a law or a rule] to become effective. When does this new law go into effect? The new tax laws won't go into effect until next year.
See also: effect, go

come/go into efˈfect

(of laws, rules, etc.) begin to be used, applied, etc: The winter timetable comes into effect in November.
See also: come, effect, go
References in periodicals archive ?
Amid a legal challenge from a slate of powerful business-aligned groups, the city of Austin's ordinance requiring employers to provide their employees with paid sick leave has been temporarily blocked from going into effect.
During the remaining 60 days before the Restoring Internet Freedom Order becomes law, there is expected to be a considerable amount of push back to prevent it from going into effect or to mitigate the effect it will have on consumers.
012484) from going into effect this Sunday, June 25, 2017.
The City Council in Bisbee, a town of about 5,600 residents, in April adopted an ordinance establishing civil unions for both same-sex and opposite-sex couples, going into effect in May.
Salvadoran and US officials in San Salvador celebrated the first anniversary of the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA), saying the accord is boosting economic growth and creating jobs only a year after going into effect, reports AP (March 1, 2007):
123(R) is going into effect. Since June 15, certain public companies have been accounting for share-based payment transactions--including employee stock option compensation--as an expense, often against their will and better judgment.
More than 80 plaintiffs have filed suit in federal court to stop BCRA from going into effect. The League has filed an amicus brief on the limits on sham issue ads, and has worked in cooperation with other organizations that have also filed amicus briefs on other aspects of the suit.
Environmental Protection Agency pollution regulations are going into effect next spring, reported the Kentucky Post for July 18th.
EPA Administrator Christie Todd Whitman announced on April 16 that the new expanded definition of what constitutes "discharge of dredged material" was going into effect. "The Bush administration is committed to keeping our waterways clean and safe," she said.