go down a/the road

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go down a/the road

To act, behave, or do things in a particular way or manner. Everyone fears Stephen is going down the road to alcoholism just as his father did.
See also: down, go, road
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Marisa Copat, who saw the incident, said she was driving her motorcycle from Purok Mahayahay, Barangay Dao, when she saw the jeepney going down the road so fast.
He added: "I think there is huge merit in going down the road of some type of a household charge.
A Labour government that will set us on the road to a fairer economy or going down the road to another referendum with the SNP."
There is absolutely no point in going down the road of imposing decisions on people, on organisations.
By joining these authorities we would be making the savings needed, instead of going down the road of privatisation, which would not guarantee first-class services to the taxpayers.
The significant improvement in the country's foreign-exchange reserve position leaves the National Bank of Hungary with good ammunition to step in the spot markets going down the road.'
If you lived where I do you would find it quite a trial trying to negotiate the obstacle course of wheelie bins especially with a wheelchair or buggy when going down the road.
For this government to start going back on their word where pensioners' benefits are concerned would be going down the road to ruin, seeing many pensioners back on the poverty line again.
"We are not against sharing resources with anyone, as part of keeping down costs, but we will certainly not be going down the road of any merger with Rugby."
Going down the road of letting a relative decide is beyond comprehension if it is your mother or father.
LIGHTNING STAR has won seven races during his long career, and I won't be going down the road of calling him a dog, so perhaps it's best to describe him as a tricky ride.
"If a convoy is going down the road and sees something up ahead that looks unusual, they can literally stop, put one of these things together and launch it, fly down the road and see what's down there--without endangering the convoy."
The rider, Boston's Paul Revere, had been warned just hours before by his friend Richard Devens that nine or ten mounted British soldiers had been spotted going down the road to Lexington earlier that night.
(We use the term partnership, not in the strict legal sense but to describe any type of co-ownership arrangement.) People entering partnerships need to know with whom they are getting involved, exactly what the deal is, and where they are going down the road.
What, beyond sheer habit, keeps us from going down the road to another place, another institution, another industry?