go around

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go around

1. To bypass something by taking an indirect path. Go around to the back if the front door is locked.
2. To circumvent someone or something. I tried to go around Dad by asking Mom for permission, but she wasn't fooled. Is there a way to go around the security protocol?
3. To be able to be shared among a group of people. I don't want to take more green beans if there's not enough to go around.
4. To do something regularly. She just goes around thinking that everyone will love her as much as she loves herself.
5. To circulate. I'm not leaving the house if the flu is going around!
6. To rotate. The baby's been having a great time watching the Ferris wheel go around.
See also: around, go
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

go around someone

 
1. Lit. to walk or travel in such a way as to avoid hitting or touching someone. I can't move from this place right now. You'll have to go around me.
2. Idiomatic to avoid dealing with someone. I try to go around Steve. He can be very difficult. We will want to go around the boss. He will say no if asked.
See also: around, go

go around

(with someone) Go to hang around (with someone).
See also: around, go

go around doing something

to move around doing something. She keeps going around telling lies about me. Please stop going around knocking things over. She goes around helping whomever she can.
See also: around, go
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

go around

1. Also, go round. Satisfy a demand or need, as in Is there enough food to go around? [Mid-1800s]
2. Same as go about, def. 1.
3. go around with. Same as go with, def. 1.
4. go or run around in circles . Engage in excited but useless activity. For example, Bill ran around in circles trying organize us but to no avail. This idiom was first recorded in 1933. For what goes around comes around, see under full circle.
See also: around, go
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

go around

or go round
v.
1. To form or follow an indirect path that avoids something: Go around the fence if the gate is locked. Don't try to cross the marsh—go around.
2. To form or follow some circular path; loop around something: The cars have already gone around the track 200 times. Our bus almost tipped over when it went around the turn. This bracelet goes around your ankle.
3. To move in a circle around something: The earth goes around the sun once every 365 days. Could you go around to the back of the barn and get the ladder?
4. To rotate: We went to the back of the boat and watched the paddle wheel go around.
5. To go here and there; move from place to place: We went around the city with the tour group. I went around to all the shops looking for a particular type of perfume.
6. To walk around, or appear in public, especially in a particular state of dress: I used to go around in a bright yellow coat.
7. To pass or be passed from place to place or from person to person: A flu is going around, so make sure you wash your hands frequently. There are some strange stories going around about that empty house. A box of pencils is going around—please take one and pass it on.
8. To do something regularly or as a matter of course, especially in a carefree or selfish manner: He goes around boasting about his new watch. You can't go around expecting people to pay for you.
9. To satisfy the needs of a group. Used with the infinitive: There were not enough chairs to go around, so some of us sat on the floor. There is plenty of popcorn to go around.
See also: around, go
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
SUN round with EARTH round with MOON round going around while going
Alvarez has been busy going around the country to supposedly preside over oath-taking ceremonies of new members of PDP-Laban.
Speaking of the Bird, reports of a giant vertical structure sprouting up in Chris Borst's Oceanside, California backyard are going around with area vert dogs grabbing their PD's and runnin' in anticipation.
Going around can be a busy time, and scrounging around for the balked-landing checklist is a no-no.
That's because that's what the law says, so I want to go around the country and point to them and tell the people, 'Do not elect people like that because they are not yet in office and they are already violating the law,' she said of her opponents who have started going around even before the official campaign launch early this month.
In most of the airplanes we fly, going around can be a relatively simple matter.
Bong Revilla, among those charged with plunder and graft over the P10-billion pork barrel scam, for going around thanking fans and supporters and defending himself against allegations that he misused his pork barrel.
As usual, your staff report, "Going Around," in the June 2012 issue was excellent and made clear what to do and what not to do when confronted with the need to perform a missed approach.
And the reason you're going around may not even be something you can readily identify; controllers frequently command a go-around when the preceding traffic is slow to exit the runway.
Often, it should be the first part of the answer to a questionable landing--with the second part of the answer being, "Yes, I'm going around."
Even a cursory look at NTSB accident data makes it clear that trying to salvage a "blown" landing by continuing with the landing has a far lower rate of success just going around.
I found the article "Going Around" (June) timely, having recently made the most difficult landing in my 30-plus years of flying (after going around with the first attempt, of course).
If you're flying an aircraft with retractable gear, practice going around and doing several circuits in the traffic pattern with the gear in the down position.