go to war (over someone or something)

(redirected from goes to war)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

go to war (over someone or something)

To engage in an intense conflict with someone or something for some reason. Despite the connotations of "war," the phrase is often applied to commonplace situations. OK, so your assistant ordered the wrong pens. Do you really want to go to war over it? You stole the captain of the football team's girlfriend, and you're surprised he's ready to go to war?
See also: go, someone, to, war
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

go to war (over someone or something)

to wage a war over someone or something. (Often an exaggeration.) We aren't going to go to war over this, are we? Do you want to go to war over Sarah? Is she that important to you?
See also: go, to, war
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
I n Punch Goes to War, 1939-1945, the gamut of wartime attitudes, scorn at the fumbling bureaucracy of government (particularly the pomposity of the Ministry of Information and the calm, sardonic and ironic view of wartime postures, attitudes and confusion) is brilliantly captured in a series of cartoons by such master draughtsmen as Fougasse (Kenneth Bird, Punch's art director) E.H.
It no longer makes sense that Lebanon alone goes to war while Syria goes to peace talks, he remarked.
"When Media Goes to War: Hegemonic Discourse, Public Opinion, and the Limits of Dissent" discusses the media and its impact on the political opinions of he country, and in essence, its impact on the political direction of the country.
British historian Brian Lavery presents Churchill Goes To War: Winston's Wartime Journeys, an in-depth examination of not only Churchill's historic meetings with Roosevelt, Stalin, and other leaders during the course of World War II, but also the harrowing logistics and risks involved in transporting a prime minister through dangerous skies and across hostile oceans during an era of global war.
Still, I find this omission significant in light of the rising numbers of women in the military and newsmagazine cover stories asking what happens when mom goes to war. As of 2002, (according to the Women's Research & Education Institute) 15 percent of U.S.
"When the United States finally goes to war again in the Persian Gulf, it will not constitute a settling of old scores, or just an enforced disarmament of illegal weapons, or a distraction in the war on terror," writes Barnett.