go downhill

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go downhill

To steadily worsen. After my parents opened my report card and saw how bad my grades were, it all went downhill from there. You better come to the hospital right away—Great-Uncle Edmund's health had really gone downhill.
See also: downhill, go
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

go downhill

[for something] to decline and grow worse and worse. This industry is going downhill. We lose money every year. As one gets older, one's health tends to go downhill.
See also: downhill, go
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

go downhill

Deteriorate, worsen, as in Ever since the recession began, the business has been going downhill. The figurative use of downhill for "decline" dates from the mid-1800s. Also see downhill all the way.
See also: downhill, go
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

go downhill

COMMON
1. If something goes downhill, it becomes worse or less successful. Since I started to work longer hours things have gone steadily downhill. We were amazed at the speed with which the weather was going downhill. Note: Downhill can be used in many structures connected with becoming worse or less successful. For the movie business, it was all downhill from there. His career was heading downhill fast.
2. If someone goes downhill, they become more ill. In February 1825 Maria became ill, was sent home, rapidly went downhill and died aged 11.
See also: downhill, go
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

go downhill

become worse; deteriorate.
See also: downhill, go
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˌgo downˈhill

get worse: My work has been going downhill ever since my divorce.This restaurant has definitely gone downhill since I last came here.
See also: downhill, go
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

go downhill

in. to decline. Things began to go downhill when the county cut the maintenance budget.
See also: downhill, go
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

go downhill

Deteriorate, decline. Although it would seem that going down a hill is easier than going up, downhill has meant a decline since the 1500s, although Daniel Defoe also used it in the sense of easy (“a very short cut, and all down hill,” Robinson Crusoe, 1719). An 1856 history of England had the sense of declining: “The monks had traveled swiftly on the downhill road of human corruption.”
See also: downhill, go
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in classic literature ?
How fast a fellow goes downhill when he once gets his head before his legs.
IF it ever all goes downhill for The Saturdays, Una Healy would be a perfect match as host of Blind Date version 2.0.
IF it ever all goes downhill for The Saturdays, I know where Una Healy is ending up.
But the date goes downhill when the pair go back to his house for a coffee - and Eric reveals he still lives with his mother.
But the date goes downhill when the pair go back to his house for a coffee -and Eric reveals he still lives with his mother.
The fear that most owners have, and rightfully so, said Seligman, is that the tenant goes downhill and the lease becomes an asset in a bankruptcy case, a judge can allow anyone to come in and operate a business that the owner would not normally allow in their property.