goal


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move the goal

To alter the rules or parameters of a situation in such a way as to suit one's needs or objectives, making it more difficult for someone else to succeed, keep pace, or achieve an opposing objective. (A US variant of the more common British phrase "move the goalposts.") Primarily heard in US. I hate arguing with that type of person. As soon as you start wearing down their logic, they just move the goal on the whole thing! We're never going to get the book design finished in time if the publisher keeps moving the goal every couple of months like this!
See also: goal, move

move the goal line

To alter the rules or parameters of a situation in such a way as to suit one's needs or objectives, making it more difficult for someone else to succeed, keep pace, or achieve an opposing objective. (A variant of the more common "move the goalposts.") Primarily heard in UK. I hate arguing with that type of person. As soon as you start wearing down their logic, they just move the goal line on the whole thing! We're never going to get the book design finished in time if the publisher keeps moving the goal line every couple of months like this!
See also: goal, line, move

an own goal

1. In sports, a goal that a player accidentally scores for the opposing team. I can't believe we lost the championship because of an own goal. I was trying to get the puck out of our zone, but I scored an own goal—how mortifying!
2. An action pursued because it seems beneficial but that ultimately has a detrimental effect. Sheila's speech was supposed to win her more supporters, but it became an own goal once she started ranting off-topic. The law seemed promising, but it has generated such strong opposition that it's become an own goal for the president.
See also: goal, own

squad goals

The aspirations, desires, or values of one's group of close friends, often illustrated in an image posted on social media that is captioned with the phrase as a hashtag. Check out this selfie of Jenny and her friends at the library. She hashtagged it with "squad goals." See you all bright and early tomorrow at the protest! #squadgoals
See also: goal, squad

goals

slang Something that one aspires to be or have. Despite "goals" being plural, it is often used with singular subjects. Her sleek, shiny hair is just goals. My mom and her college friends are seriously goals—they've been friends for 25 years!
See also: goal

move the goalposts

To alter the rules or parameters of a situation in such a way as to suit one's needs or objectives, making it more difficult for someone else to succeed, keep pace, or achieve an opposing objective. I hate arguing with that type of person. As soon as you start wearing down their logic, they just move the goalposts on the whole thing! We're never going to get the book design finished in time if the publisher keeps moving the goalposts every couple of months like this! Claiming victory after cutting the tax by a small fraction when in fact you had said you'd abolish it altogether is really moving the goalposts, isn't it?
See also: move

score an own goal

To earn a point for the opposing team by scoring a goal on one's own net. (Used especially in reference to soccer.) We were never able to regain our lead after Thomas scored an own goal late in the second half.
See also: goal, own, score

fall short of one's goal(s)

 and fall short of the goal(s); fall short of the record
to fail to achieve a goal. We fell short of our goal of collecting a thousand dollars. Ann ran a fast race, but fell short of the record.
See also: fall, goal, of, short

an own goal

BRITISH
COMMON An own goal is a course of action which is intended to bring you an advantage and which instead causes a problem for you. It was a classic own goal by the fashion house. They brought their prices down to attract more customers but lost the high-end customers that they already had. Note: In sports such as football and hockey, if someone scores an own goal, they accidentally score a goal for the team they are playing against by knocking the ball into their own net.
See also: goal, own

move the goalposts

If someone moves the goalposts, they change the rules or aims in a situation or activity, in order to gain an advantage and to make things more difficult for the other people involved. He was always moving the goalposts so that we could never anticipate what he wanted. They seem to move the goalposts every time I meet the required conditions. Note: You can also say that someone shifts the goalposts. The administration is shifting the goalposts and changing its demands.
See also: move

score an own goal

1 (in football) score a goal by mistake against your own side. 2 do something that has the unintended effect of harming your own interests. informal
2 1991 Brian MacArthur Despatches from the Gulf War Television's mission to explain was taken to its outer limit and at times scored an own goal by developing a bias against understanding.
See also: goal, own, score

move (or shift) the goalposts

unfairly alter the conditions or rules of a procedure during its course.
1989 Dimensions Many companies have, in recent years, moved the goalposts so that those who used to qualify no longer do so.
See also: move

move the ˈgoalposts

(informal, disapproving, especially British English) change the rules for something, or the conditions under which it is done, so that the situation becomes more difficult for somebody: Our union is angry at the management for moving the goalposts during the pay talks. Every time agreement is reached they put up another obstacle.
See also: move
References in periodicals archive ?
At every match it has been established the number of goals scored by different methods of throwing from a total number of throws at the goal.
Oaks Christian 7, Bell Gardens 1: Kelsea Smith had two goals and four assists, setting a program record for most points in a playoff game, to lead host Oaks Christian of Westlake Village (14-6-1) to the quarterfinals for the sixth straight year.
The results of this study highlights the need for continued teacher and parent support of student efforts to achieve the levels of intrinsic motivation and self-efficacy necessary for the self-regulated learning processes involved in goal setting and student-led conferences.
He is also in a position to cut off penetrating passes or a shot on goal.
Unfortunately, many physicians never ask about the patient's desired goals and results or determine whether what they can achieve is desirable.
Executives who set goals just to meet short-term EPS expectations typically assume that strong capital market performance is the result of delivering what the market wants.
The goal in writing this is to create a story in which a triumphant camper defeats the threat to emotionally safe actions with agreed upon behaviors.
Reachable--Based on your skills and experience, the goal is realistic.
If your organization defines leadership as taking initiative, being accountable for outcomes and aligning individual goals to the organization, then this becomes the basis for your expectations of your employees' leadership contributions.
This might occur if an individual repeatedly experiences failure in a particular goal pursuit (e.
Members of ethnic minority groups emphasized financial considerations in both their career goals and perceived barriers to goal attainment.
And nothing motivates more than the positive feedback you get from successfully moving toward your goal.
Goal 1: Conduct an ongoing review and comparison of the cost, content, length, and location of programs offered by TEI and other sponsors, and make recommendations for change.
The Strategic Planning Team has created five main goals and several strategies for achieving each goal.
For example, in 1995-96 the Department of Corrections set a goal in the Staff Services Occupational Group to hire five African Americans in two years.