go-ahead


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go ahead

1. To proceed or move ahead of someone or something. I'm not ready to order yet, so you can go ahead of me.
2. To bring or move something ahead of someone or something else. You go ahead with the groceries while I pay the bill.
3. To continue or proceed, especially despite problems or challenges. It snowed so much that the event couldn't go ahead as planned, unfortunately. Oh, we're going ahead with our weekend plans—I refuse to let a little rain stop us!
4. To do something without hesitation. In this usage, the phrase is usually used to urge the listener to take some action. Go ahead and knock on the door—I'm pretty sure she's home. You guys go ahead and start—I don't want your dinner to get cold while I'm stuck in traffic.
See also: ahead, go

go-ahead

1. noun A signal to proceed. When used as a noun, the phrase is typically preceded by "the." Don't worry, the boss gave us the go-ahead to call that guy back. Please don’t do anything until I give the go-ahead, OK?
2. adjective In sports, describing something, such as a goal or run, that gives a team or competitor the lead. And Jones scores the go-ahead goal with less than a minute left! He comes up to bat with the go-ahead run on second.

Go ahead.

Please do it.; You have my permission and encouragement to do it. Alice: I'm leaving. John: Go ahead. See if I care. Jane: Can I put this one in the refrigerator? Sue: Sure. Go ahead.
See also: ahead, go

go ahead

 (with something)
1. to continue with something; to continue with plans to do something. Can we go ahead with our party plans? Let's go ahead with it.
2. to carry something ahead. Please go ahead with the baggage. I will meet you at the ticket counter. Will you please go ahead with the cake? I will bring the ice cream in a minute.
See also: ahead, go

go ahead

(of someone or something) to get in front of and proceed someone or something. Please let me go ahead of you. The car carrying the parade marshall went ahead of the others.
See also: ahead, go

go ahead

1. Move forward rapidly or act without restraint; also, continue something. For example, If you want to borrow the tractor, go ahead. This expression is often put as go ahead with, as in Are you going ahead with the house party? The term dates from the mid-1600s and gave rise to give the go-ahead, meaning "give permission to move or act in some way."
2. go ahead of. Make one's way to the front of, as in They went ahead of me to see the purser. [Mid-1700s]
See also: ahead, go

go ahead

v.
1. To move forward in front of someone or something: We moved to the right lane to let the faster cars go ahead of us. I went ahead to find seats while my friends bought popcorn.
2. To continue despite a concern or hesitation: The game will go ahead as scheduled even if it rains. If you want to take an apple, go ahead.
3. To begin, especially after waiting or planning. Often used in conjunction with another verb: I have to work late tonight—go ahead and eat without me.
4. go ahead of To perform an action before someone else: Whenever we play chess, my sister always goes ahead of me.
5. go ahead with To continue doing something, especially after a delay or despite a concern: The students went ahead with the prank despite the principal's warnings.
See also: ahead, go

go-ahead

n. permission to proceed; the signal to go ahead. (see also say-so.) I gave him the go-ahead, and the tanks started moving in.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company, which operates under the name People's Express, was bought by Newcastle-upon-Tyne-based train and bus operator Go-Ahead.
But while insisting that the pounds 2bn Severnside Airport east of Newport would still be commercially viable, Mr Stephen admitted that if the speculation was true, it would make securing the go-ahead much more difficult.
In its pre-close trading update for the six months ending 27 December 2014, David Brown, group chief executive of Go-Ahead, said: "Overall trading in the year to date has been robust, with a solid performance in our bus and rail operations.
Newcastle-based Go-Ahead, which also runs trains and handles cargo and car parking at 15 airports, reported a pounds 147m rise in revenue to pounds 2,346.
Go-Ahead chairman Sir Patrick Brown - announcing six monthly results - said the business had "retained a bidding team to prepare for the forthcoming competitions for both the newly defined West Midlands and East Midlands franchises".
Go-Ahead chief executive David Brown said: "Our bus and rail businesses have delivered a robust performance, in line with expectations.
Within the rail arm, the operating performance at Southern continued to be excellent with good passenger volume growth, and the recovery in passenger numbers at Thameslink following the terrorist attacks in the summer had continued through the period, Go-Ahead added.
Go-Ahead said Martin Ballinger, 60, will leave the rail and bus company at the end of December.
PUBLIC transport group Go-Ahead plans to make profits of PS100m a year by 2016 from running bus services in the UK.
Go-Ahead is confident that the profitability of Aviance, which has been tussling with the downturn in the aviation market since September 11, would improve during the year.
PUBLIC transport giant Go-Ahead is continuing to look for small "bolt-on" bus acquisitions after adding three businesses to the group since February.
Transport group Go-Ahead yesterday snapped up privately owned bus operator Wilts & Dorset for pounds 31.