go with the crowd

go with the crowd

To do what everyone else is doing. This phrase often has a negative connotation, suggesting that the speaker is not an independent thinker or is easily swayed. I'm worried that my daughter will just go with the crowd at the party and end up doing things that she doesn't really want to do.
See also: crowd, go
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

follow/go with the ˈcrowd

(often disapproving) do as everyone else does because you have no ideas of your own: Dress in the way you like and try not to follow the crowd. OPPOSITE: lead the way
See also: crowd, follow, go
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in classic literature ?
Then there was nothing more for him to do but go with the crowd in the morning, and keep in the front row and look eager, and when he failed, go back home, and play with little Kotrina and the baby.
He remembered his last night there: the red foggy darkness, the hungry crowds before the theatres, the hand-organs, the feverish rhythm of the blurred, crowded streets, and the feeling of letting himself go with the crowd. He shuddered and looked about him at the poor unconscious companions of his journey, unkempt and travel-stained, now doubled in unlovely attitudes, who had come to stand to him for the ugliness he had brought into the world.
"I like to entertain and when I'm in that rhythm I like to go with the crowd.
People who do not make it a living to earn money from investing will more often than not go with the crowd. In fact, some say that the true value of a company is its market price per share because that price is based on the collective wisdom of all investors in the stock market.
Never one to go with the crowd, Revelation Road - Shelby's most personal record yet - was released in October last year.
She said they had to take a lead; they should not just go with the crowd but must do what was right for their institutions.
I've come here in the past and seen the team have a right go with the crowd roaring them on.
The five-page memo says Mr Blair needs to "go with the crowds wanting more" and adds that he should be mindful the effect his departure will have on the man favoured to succeed him, Chancellor Gordon Brown, according to the paper
The five-page memo says Mr Blair needs to "go with the crowds wanting more" but should be mindful the effect his departure will have on the man favoured to succeed him, Chancellor Gordon Brown.
The secret memo we revealed in September read: "As TB enters his final phase he needs to go with the crowds wanting more."