go to the toilet

go to the toilet

euphemism To urinate or defecate. I just need to go to the toilet first, and then we can leave.
See also: go, toilet

go to the toilet

Fig. Euph. to use a toilet for defecation or urination. Jimmy washed his hands after he went to the toilet. Excuse me, I have to go to the toilet.
See also: go, toilet
References in periodicals archive ?
When discharged he was still unable to go to the toilet normally.
She needed to go to the toilet, she moved from the bedroom and in doing so knocked a tea light off a bedside cabinet.
Before he could order a drink, he decided to go to the toilet.
The second is to reward the dog every time - or as often as possible - they go to the toilet where they should.
Encourage her to go outside regularly, or if she is showing signs that she is about to go to the toilet, such as sniffling and circling.
He added: "The problem is the older people - some are on water tablets for example and have to go to the toilet every 20 minutes.
Almost six in 10 would be more likely to use their hard-earned cash to go to the toilet if it was clean and tidy, while half would pay if it was stocked with nice hand soap or moisturiser.
Malik also asserted that the members of the Hurriyat "don't even go to the toilet without asking Pakistan."
She said her daughter, who is unable to go to the toilet herself, was told by her teacher to have her twin help her when a learning assistant was not there.
Oyewole, who is the General Overseer of the Church, said he could not sleep neither could he go to the toilet for three months while going through the travails.
A recent survey by Plan International UK found that 68% of girls aged 14-21 had a rule that they couldn't go to the toilet in lesson time at school.
"Ashley has been toilet-trained since she was a very small child but she needs help to go to the toilet as she can't stand or change herself."
I'll tell stories about how I was secretly hoping for a Trump victory, how racists go to the toilet, and how a box of Yorkshire Tea got me into hot water at US Customs.
Issues include people being washed and dressed and then put back to bed to make it easier for staff, residents not getting enough to eat and drink or not getting the right medication, and people not getting help to go to the toilet in time.
He assumed it was a dad helping a son go to the toilet, until he noticed his little boy's odd socks under the cubicle door and realised to his horror it was his son in the cubicle with Onions.