go south


Also found in: Financial.

go south

1. To escape; to vanish or disappear. (Not necessarily in a southerly direction.) Everyone in the gang went south when they learned that the police had discovered their hideout.
2. To fall or drop; to depreciate; to lose quality or value. (Especially related to finances or stock exchanges.) The company's stock profile continued going south for the third day in a row today. I used to be a big player in the stock market, but all my investments have gone south lately.
3. To cease working or functioning; to quit, fail, or fall apart. Talks between the labor union and the construction firm went south yesterday, so it looks like workers will be on strike again soon. My computer is only a month old, and it's already gone south.
See also: go, south

go south

 and head South 
1. Sl. to make an escape; to disappear. (Not necessarily in a southerly direction.) Lefty went South the minute he got out of the pen. The mugger headed South just after the crime.
2. Sl. to fall; to go down. (Securities markets.) All the stock market indexes went South today. The market headed South today at the opening bell
3. Sl. to quit; to drop out of sight. Fred got discouraged and went South. I think he gave up football permanently. After pulling the bank job, Wilbur went South for a few months.
See also: go, south

go south

Deteriorate or decline, as in The stock market is headed south again. This expression is generally thought to allude to compasses and two-dimensional maps where north is up and south is down. However, among some Native Americans, the term was a euphemism for dying, and possibly this sense led to the present usage. [Slang; first half of 1900s] Also see go west.
See also: go, south

go South

and head South
1. in. to fall; to go down. (Securities markets. This is a way of saying down. South is usually “down” on a map.) The market headed South today at the opening bell.
2. in. to quit; to drop out of sight. After pulling the bank job, Shorty went South for a few months.
3. in. to make an escape; to disappear. The mugger went South just after the crime.
See also: go, south

go south

Fail, go bankrupt, decline. This colloquialism probably alludes to two-dimensional maps where north is up (at the top) and south is down. Another theory is that in some Native Americans’ (Sioux) belief system the term means “to die.” From the first half of the twentieth century on, however, it became particularly common among business writers. For example, “Dorothea’s become involved in some questionable real estate ventures that went south very recently” (David Baldacci, Hour Game, 2004). See also go belly-up.
See also: go, south
References in periodicals archive ?
class="MsoNormalWhen things go south, you'll be glad you prepared.
'The 'Go South Philippine Islands' would also be the banner campaign to be adapted by the Go Mindanao Bus that would have a grand launch in May,' the DOT said.
The 25-year-old - who has spoken of his torment over a missed chance for Hibs in Sunday's Scottish Cup Final defeat to Celtic - informed the Edinburgh club weeks ago that he had agreed to go south this summer.
The overpass will enable westbound motorists on CR 101 to cross Texas 288 and go south on the highway.
Driving Directions: Go south of 1-75 to Exit 193 Jacaranda Blvd.
They will go south onto the canal system of the north Midlands.
Cars on the outside lane wanting to go south on to the Tyne Bridge have to cross the bus lane on the inside lane.
This is my last season at Ibrox and although I want to stay if I'm not going to play I'd prefer to go south."
"The best thing was to let Lee go south to London."
Expecting movement at the borders in the spring of 2005, Cornell and Darby had set up some shipments to go south. Unfortunately, the recent last-minute ruling in the U.S.
Three different worlds, three heroes who all have dreams to go south and a magical artifact is the deciding factor on the success or failure of the missions that demonstrates that these worlds are definitely linked.
I especially appreciated the August Sounding Board ("Don't let your life go south") by Kevin Axe.
He's a 130-horse in the north, but I know that if we go south and take on one of Martin Pipe's 130-rated horses, he won't see which way it goes!"