go public


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go public

1. To publicize or reveal something. When do you guys plan to go public with your relationship?
2. To become a publicly traded company (which requires issuing shares of stock for sale). That company stands to make a lot of money from going public.
See also: go, public

go public

 (with something)
1. to sell to the public shares of a privately owned company. (Securities markets.) The company decided not to go public because the economy was so bad at the time. Well go public at a later time.
2. to reveal something to the public. It's too early to go public with the story. Just let me know when we can go public with this press release.
See also: go, public

go public

Become a publicly held company, that is, issue ownership shares in the form of stock. For example, As soon as the company grows a little bigger and begins to show a profit, we intend to go public . [Mid-1900s]
See also: go, public

go public

COMMON
1. If you go public, you make something known to a lot of people, especially through the TV, newspapers, etc. Railtrack and the government went public with their plans for the west coast main line. Several ministers went public to deny the claims.
2. If a company goes public, it stops being privately owned, and people can buy shares in it. On May 14, Rambus, a microchip maker, went public.
See also: go, public

go public

1 become a public company. 2 reveal details about a previously private concern.
See also: go, public

go ˈpublic


1 (of a company) sell shares to the public: We’re hoping to go public early next year.
2 make a public statement about a private matter because you think this is the right thing to do: He decided to go public about his drug problem in order to warn other athletes of the dangers.
See also: go, public

go public

1. in. to sell to the public shares of a privately owned company. (Securities markets.) We’ll go public at a later time.
2. in. to reveal something to the public. (Especially with with, as in the examples.) Just let me know when we can go public with this.
See also: go, public
References in periodicals archive ?
And once it does, it'll probably be years before tech start-ups will realistically be able to go public, frustrating their investors and employees alike.
"I was going to go public but was persuaded that in doing so, as an executive member, I could be perceived to be criticising officers, and that was not what I intended at all.
According to statistics compiled by the Taiwan Stock Exchange (TWSE), as of the end of November, 42 overseas Taiwanese firms had applied to go public via primary listing, half of them from the electronics, biotechnology and medical sectors.
JMP Securities LLC, Needham & Company LLC and Pacific Crest Securities LLC will help in the company's efforts to go public in their capacity of co-managers.
Of course, getting out the message takes work (it uses up "political capital") so presidents will be most inclined to do it (1) when they need to do it in order to win in Congress (the president's prospects for legislative victory are doubtful if he does not go public), (2) when legislative victory is particularly valuable for presidents, and (3) when their "political capital" is abundant (e.g., public approval is high).
James, dressed in a company T-shirt and chinos, said the e-commerce firm could go public in three years.
18 April 2011 - French web-marketing solutions company Concoursmania said today it wants to go public on the Alternext segment of Euronext Paris, seeking funds to diversify its offer and make acquisitions.
Companies go public to get access to capital, and Facebook clearly has access to capital, Kerner says.
Kung love: go public at HOLLYOAKS babe Gemma Atkinson has struck it lucky in love with a kung fu star who wowed Britain's Got Talent.
Many large-scale listings are also likely to be put on hold this year, including Tokyo Stock Exchange Group Inc., which has decided to delay its plan to go public until after fiscal 2010 due to deteriorating business conditions caused by the global financial crisis.
There are three main ways a private company can go public: through an initial public offering (IPO), a reverse merger, or a registered spin-off.
After all, it's already happened in Australia, with the recent initial public offering of a law firm, and the United Kingdom is clearing the way for firms there to go public.
If you've grown the business, made it a success, and now want to depart--well, you have a problem if you hope to "go public."
Mark Heesen, president of the National Venture Capital Association, says that many private companies are preferring to be bought by a public company rather than go public themselves.