go overboard


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go overboard

1. Literally, to fall off of a boat. Be careful standing so close to the edge—we don't want anyone to go overboard!
2. To act without restraint in some area. Did I go overboard with the Christmas decorations? I'm worried I bought enough Christmas lights to light up Times Square.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

 
1. Fig. to fall out of a boat or off of a ship; to fall overboard. Be careful or you will go overboard. Someone went overboard in the fog.
2. Fig. to do too much; to be extravagant. Look, Sally, let's have a nice party, but don't go overboard. It doesn't need to be fancy. Okay, you can buy a big comfortable car, but don't go overboard on price.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

Show excessive enthusiasm, act in an excessive way. For example, It's easy to go overboard with a new stock offering, or She really went overboard, hiring the most expensive caterer. [Mid-1900s]
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

1 be highly enthusiastic. 2 behave immoderately; go too far.
The idea behind this idiom is that of recklessly jumping over the side of a ship into the water.
See also: go, overboard

go ˈoverboard (about/for somebody/something)

(informal) be too excited or enthusiastic about something or about doing something: I told her just to cook a simple meal but she went completely overboard.He doesn’t just like her. He’s gone completely overboard about her.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

in. to do far more than is necessary. Now don’t go overboard for us. We’re just folks.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard

To go to extremes, especially as a result of enthusiasm.
See also: go, overboard

go overboard, to

To go to extremes; to overreact, especially in favor of something or someone. This expression, which conjures up the extreme act of jumping or falling off a ship, dates from the first half of the twentieth century. For a time it signified living beyond one’s means, but that meaning is no longer current. John P. Marquand used the term in its contemporary sense (Melville Goodwin, 1951): “Did you ever hear about General Goodwin going overboard over an American girl in Paris?”
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References in periodicals archive ?
But boss Ron Bradbury does not want to go overboard, trying to keep the feet of talented youngsters such as Steve Farmer, who made his league debut just a few days after his 18th birthday, Richard Barratt, Leon Kelly and Paul White very much on the ground.
"I say the same thing about supplements that I say about drinking alcohol or eating steak: Don't go overboard."
Some hotels go overboard to please the business client, and that pleases Vivian.
"You can go overboard in trying to freeze what exists now," Hoagland explains.
However, if we believed participants were going to take the program on board, perhaps we could have spent more time during the program helping them learn not to go overboard with their new behavioral skills.
That willingness to lend the FBI's imprimatur to unverified allegations probably didn't prompt any agent to go overboard. But when the FBI winks at even a little entrepreneurial spying, there may be cause for worry.
He didn't go overboard. The expectation was that he will go overboard,' he said, in apparent reference to Mr.
I MIGHT have to change my mind about Ahmed Ajtebi, as I have never really bought into the hype, and while you can't go overboard, his coolness in pressure situations has to be admired.
While four of the seven varieties--the Spicy Penne Puttanesca, Pasta e Fagioli, Moroccan Stew, and Southwest Cornbread & Red Beans--don't go overboard on saturated fat, the other three are weighed down by butter, cheese, and cream cheese.
If you go overboard and make a little too much sauce, add a small amount of orange juice to prevent browning and refrigerate for later.
Other fishermen in the area saw him go overboard. He did not resurface.
COULD somebody tell Lanarkshire dumpling Bill Tynan there's nothing wrong with supporting the English football team - as long as you don't go overboard.
Recognise Arsenal's feat by all means, if they achieve it, but let's not go overboard and toss away another bit of our heritage just as we did so willingly with Wembley's Twin Towers.
So I do hope the city won't go overboard in its efforts to create an image of wide- ranging develop -ment,now that image has become a current fetish.