go on to (something)

(redirected from go onto something)

go on to (something)

To progress to something better or more prominent. Quite a few soap actors have gone on to win or be nominated for Oscars, actually. After being an intern there for three years, I'm ready to go on to bigger and better things. Did that famous child actor go on to do much as an adult?
See also: go, on

go on to something

to advance to something or to doing something. After a few years she went on to even greater heights. Larry went on to found his own company.
See also: go, on
References in periodicals archive ?
Give those to the robots, and let your existing workforce go onto something more interesting, perhaps in wrangling robots.
"Occasionally, I thought of something really witty to say, but by the time I'd got my mouth together, we'd go onto something else!" Panel shows might not be the South African-born foodie's strong point, but one thing's for sure - millions of viewers will be excited to see her back on screens for the ninth series - after seven on the BBC - of Bake Off.
"Occasionally, I thought of something really witty to say, but by the time I'd got my mouth together, we'd go onto something else!" Panel shows might not be the South Africanborn foodie's strong point, but one thing's for sure - millions of viewers will be excited to see her back on screens for the ninth series of Bake Off.
You may not go onto something else in the C-suite, but it is a seat at the table and for those that aspire to be GC, it can be something on the resume that is appealing to boards and CEOs."
They'd start conversations, forget what they were saying, go onto something else."
On the road it's all about me and there is a lot of pressure, so it was fabulous to go onto something where I just have to turn up.
You look at the companies that have come and gone that were hot for a while, and they will always go onto something else.
The user's objective is to leave the library or go onto something else with the books already in hand, in the shortest possible time, and with the least amount of hassle.
"When big publishing houses or Hollywood film companies try to cash in on certain trends we find that the public go onto something else," she said.