go off


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to go off: go off on someone

go off

1. Of an explosive device, to explode. Run! The bomb in the building could go off at any moment!
2. Of an alarm, to enter into an active state, typically resulting in a loud noise or other indication. The whole building had to evacuate because the smoke alarm went off. The silent alarm went off at the bank, we'd better check it out.
3. To depart. If you want Mom to get something for you, you better talk to her before she goes off to the store.
4. To stop functioning. You better go look for coffee in another department—our pot went off before it was finished brewing. The power went off hours ago—what's taking them so long to get it back on?
5. To happen. Considering all the problems we had beforehand, it's amazing that our party went off so well!
6. To expire, as of food or drink. "Off" in this usage means spoiled or rotten. Don't eat those leftovers—they're a week old and have definitely gone off.
7. To stop taking a medication, which is stated after "off." Didn't the doctor tell you that you have to go off a medication like this gradually?
8. To become very angry and hostile, often unexpectedly. The boss just came into my office and went off on me for no apparent reason. Every time I bring up that topic, he just goes off.
9. To talk about something at length. Grandpa went off on politics for so long that our dinner got cold.
10. To die. At Christmastime, I really miss the relatives who have gone off before us.
11. slang To orgasm. I don't think I'll sleep with him again—I didn't go off the last time.
See also: go, off

go off (with someone)

to go away with someone. Tom just now went off with Maggie. I think that Maria went off with Fred somewhere.
See also: go, off

go off

 
1. Lit. [for an explosive device] to explode. The fireworks all went off as scheduled. The bomb went off and did a lot of damage.
2. Lit. [for a sound-creating device] to make its noise. The alarm went off at six o'clock. The siren goes off at noon every day.
3. Fig. [for an event] to happen or take place. The party went off as planned. Did your medical examination go off as well as you had hoped?
See also: go, off

go off

(by oneself) to go into seclusion; to isolate oneself. She went off by herself where no one could find her. I have to go off and think about this.
See also: go, off

go off

(into something) to go away to something; to depart and go into something. He went off into the army. Do you expect me just to go off into the world and make a living?
See also: go, off

go off

1. Explode, detonate; also, make noise, sound, especially abruptly. For example, I heard the gun go off, or The sirens went off at noon. This expression developed in the late 1500s and gave rise about 1700 to the related go off half-cocked, now meaning "to act prematurely" but originally referring to the slipping of a gun's hammer so that the gun fires (goes off) unexpectedly.
2. Leave, depart, especially suddenly, as in Don't go off mad, or They went off without saying goodbye. [c. 1600]
3. Keep to the expected plan or course of events, succeed, as in The project went off smoothly. [Second half of 1700s]
4. Deteriorate in quality, as in This milk seems to have gone off. [Late 1600s]
5. Die. Shakespeare used this sense in Macbeth (5:9): "I would the friends we missed were safely arrived.-Some must go off."
6. Experience orgasm. D.H. Lawrence used this slangy sense in Lady Chatterley's Lover (1928): "You couldn't go off at the same time...." This usage is probably rare today. Also see get off, def. 8.
7. go off on a tangent. See under on a tangent.
8. go off one's head. See off one's head. Also see subsequent idioms beginning with go off.
See also: go, off

go off

v.
1. To go away: The children all went off to play at the park. Don't go off mad—let me explain!
2. To stop functioning. Used especially of electrical devices: The lights went off suddenly, and the performance began right away.
3. To occur, or be perceived as having occurred, in some particular manner: I think our party went off very well!
4. To adhere to the expected course of events or the expected plan: The project went off smoothly.
5. To stop taking some drug or medication: She went off painkillers a few weeks after the operation.
6. To make a noise; sound: The siren goes off every day at noon.
7. To undergo detonation; explode: If you push this red button, the bomb will go off.
8. go off on To begin to talk extensively about something: He went off on a series of excuses for his bad behavior.
9. go off on To berate someone directly and loudly: My boss really went off on me when she learned that I had forgotten to make the phone call.
See also: go, off
References in periodicals archive ?
"If there was only one main rival to him from Ballydoyle then that could be different, but the public look like they are going to be divided between their support for Rip Van Winkle or Fame And Glory." Coral have little doubt that John Oxx's colt will head the market, Simon Clare, spokesman for the Barking firm, said: "I think Sea The Stars will go off favourite.
"If we get rain then it would be feasible that anyone of Rip Van Winkle, Sea The Stars or Fame And Glory could go off favourite and it wouldn't be a surprise if they went off 3-1 co-favourites."
He said: "I am on standby so I just hope my bleeper doesn't go off while I'm away.
He added they told the Government, "We don't want you to default on these payments, it is your decision but a bomb will go off, it will go off in Dublin and not in Frankfurt".
David Williams of Ladbrokes said: "Earlier in the week it was a possibility, but we would be astonished if Cloudy Lane was to go off as short as Red Rum.
ALLOWING mobile phones to go off in court will be treated as contempt of court by a judge at his Warwick Crown Court hearings.
ETA set the bombs to go off during the Constitution Day bank holiday.
A YOUNG mum is calling for action over smoke alarms which go off for no apparent reason in the block of flats where she lives with her baby daughter.
A police official said authorities had received an anonymous warning that three bombs would go off at the police station in Kalithea.
FIA boss Max Mosley said: "It is inconceivable in normal circumstances that a driver would go off under double yellows.
EDINBURGH'S famous One O'Clock Gun failed to go off for only the sixth time in nearly 50 years.
The Northern Ireland soccer legend is on a waiting list for the operation and has a buzzer which will go off when doctors find an organ.