go hard with

go hard with (someone)

To be difficult, problematic, or unpleasant for someone; to be to someone's disadvantage, harm, or misfortune. It will go hard with John if he doesn't realize that Tommy is only interested in him for his money. It's going to go hard with us if the government cuts our funding any further.
See also: hard

go hard with

Fare ill, be to one's harm or disadvantage. For example, If this case gets to a jury, it will go hard with the defendant. [First half of 1500s]
See also: hard
References in classic literature ?
If there is any question about England in all this, and we were recognised, I fear it would go hard with us.
Therefore let us make for the Danaans, that it may go hard with them ere they bear away dead Patroclus to the ships.
Well, sir, to be quite plain with ye, I am one of those honest gentlemen that were in trouble about the years forty-five and six; and (to be still quite plain with ye) if I got into the hands of any of the red-coated gentry, it's like it would go hard with me.
While we'd love to support your claims, Dan, we're always suspicious when locals go hard with the "no deer here" stump speech.
The co-editors quote geographer Gus Caesar who wrote in 1962: "If a Wearsider visits a pub in Newcastle on a Saturday evening, things may go hard with him.