go for broke


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go for broke

To give something one's full effort. We have to go for broke with this marketing campaign if we want our product launch to be successful.
See also: broke, go

go for broke

to risk everything; to try as hard as possible. Okay, this is my last chance. I'm going for broke. Look at Mary starting to move in the final hundred yards of the race! She is really going for broke.
See also: broke, go

go for broke

COMMON If you go for broke, you put all your efforts or resources into a plan or idea to try to make it succeed. I had already won the Under-16 British squash championships, and I decided to go for broke and turn professional. In London's West End there is a reluctance to take risks with new plays while going for broke on musicals. Note: Go-for-broke can also be used before a noun. Three astronauts plan to walk in space today in a go-for-broke effort to retrieve a communications satellite. Note: If a gambler goes for broke, they put all their money on one game or on one hand of cards.
See also: broke, go

go for broke

risk everything in an all-out effort. informal
See also: broke, go

go for ˈbroke

(informal) risk everything in one determined effort to do something: I decided to go for broke and start my own business.
See also: broke, go

go for broke

in. to choose to risk everything; to try to succeed against great odds. We decided to go for broke, and that is exactly how we ended up.
See also: broke, go

go for broke

Risk everything; shoot the works. Most authorities believe this term comes from gambling, in which one may stake one’s resources for “all or nothing,” and probably originated in the nineteenth century. Eric Partridge claimed a more recent origin, sometime during World War II. However, broke has meant “bankrupt” or “without funds” since the late seventeenth century.
See also: broke, go