go fly a kite


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go fly a kite

To go away and leave one alone because what is being done or said is very irritating. Often used as an imperative. A: "The experiment might work better if you actually knew what you were supposed to be mixing together." B: "You know what, Jenny? Why don't you go fly a kite?"
See also: fly, go, kite
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

go fly a kite

Also, go chase yourself or climb a tree or jump in the lake or sit on a tack or soak your head . Go away and stop bothering me, as in Quit it, go fly a kite, or Go jump in the lake. All of these somewhat impolite colloquial imperatives date from the first half of the 1900s and use go as described under go and.
See also: fly, go, kite
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Go fly a kite!

verb
See also: fly, go
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

go climb a tree/fly a kite

Go away and stop annoying me. There are many other versions of these colloquial imperatives, from go chase yourself, dating from about 1900, to go jump in the lake, sit on a tack, or soak your head, also of twentieth-century provenance. All could be classed as clichés. See also go to the devil.
See also: climb, fly, go, kite, tree
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

go fly a kite

Get lost! Kite flying is an activity that is done far less now than in previous centuries. Accordingly, “go fly a kite!” is heard far less than “get lost!” “take a hike!” and “get your ass out of here!” (or something stronger).
See also: fly, go, kite
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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