go down the drain

go down the drain

To fail; to be ruined or destroyed; to be squandered or wastefully discarded. My father's company is now going down the drain because of the incompetent new CEO. All of our savings have gone down the drain ever since Jack had his little gambling spree in Las Vegas.
See also: down, drain
References in periodicals archive ?
0 seconds remaining in the extra period, but saw his efforts go down the drain no thanks to Salado's superb finish.
The Remain campaign was right to warn that workers' rights would go down the drain if we left.
One of these is Cork City where 53% of the drinking water will still go down the drain after conservation measures are introduced.
After last week's heavy downpours, organisers put contingency plans in place to make sure tomorrow's show didn't also go down the drain.
If we want to be protected against all eventualities we must sometimes expect to see money go down the drain.
If your toilet seeps water and runs around the clock, that figure starts to climb and dollars go down the drain.
However, according to Jovanovska, it turned out that the naivety of the novice in politics does not have much to do with reality where completely different rules are at work, as illusions go down the drain fast.
Palin, 45, told a press conference at her lakefront home in Wasilla, Alaska, that she wanted to take a stand and effect change, not just hit our head against the wall and watch valuable state time and money, millions of your dollars, go down the drain.
Then again, he'll probably stick Marlon Harewood up front and all our hopes will go down the drain.
Regarding his bid to set up a successful pub and microbrewery business, he said: "There are going to be people out there who would love to see me go down the drain.
So, people of Flockton, don't let this chance go down the drain.
They must live up to their promises or all that community spirit will go down the drain.
Does it mean that ink can go down the drain because it is water-based material?
Some contain alkyphenol ethoxylates (APEs), suspected hormone disruptors that can threaten wildlife after they go down the drain.