go and

go and (do something)

To be so foolish, negligent, unfortunate, or thoughtless as to do something. "Go and" in this sense is used as a modifier to express or intensify a negative sentiment regarding the action. You can have a few cookies as a snack, but don't go and spoil your appetite for dinner! I had the money in my pocket to cover rent for this month, but I went and spent it all at the bar.
See also: and

go and

This phrase is an intensifier, that is, it heightens the action indicated by the verb that follows it. For example, Don't go and eat all the leftover chicken is stronger than "Don't eat all the leftover chicken." Similarly, Thomas Gray put it in a letter (1760): "But now she has gone ... and married that Monsieur de Wolmar." Sometimes the and is omitted, as in Go tell Dad dinner is ready, or Go fly a kite, colloquial imperatives telling someone to do something. [c. 1300]
See also: and
References in classic literature ?
To think of a gell o' your age wanting to go and sit with half-a-dozen men
Coffee being presently served up stairs, he kept a watch on Fledgeby until Miss Podsnap's cup was empty, and then directed him with his finger (as if that young gentleman were a slow Retriever) to go and fetch it.
His very fingers sent entreating thrills that he would go and clutch that familiar rough buck's-horn handle, which they had so often grasped for mere affection, as it lay idle in his pocket.
And it's worse than ever now, for I'm dying to go and fight with Papa.
A program is installed on a host computer that allows a user to selectively go and download a patient record to a notebook computer," explains Jim Ingalls, Vice President of Sales and Marketing at CARE.