go along with (someone or something)

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go along with (someone or something)

1. To follow along with someone or something; to act in accordance with another's actions, especially when their motive or goal is unknown. If the cops show up at the house because the party's too loud, just go along with whatever I say. I'm going to play a prank on Jenny when she walks in. Just go along with it, OK?
2. To accompany or join someone. Can I go along with you to the mall? I need to get a new alarm clock.
3. To participate or cooperate in an activity or scheme. I'm sorry, but I can't go along with this. It's wrong.
4. To be in harmony or agreement with something. Unfortunately, the information we learned does not go along with the doctor's claims.
See also: go

go along with someone or something

 
1. Lit. to travel along with someone or something. Dorothy went along with the scarecrow for a while until they met a lion.
2. Fig. to agree with someone or agree to something. I will go along with you on that matter. I will go along with Sharon's decision, of course.
3. Fig. to consent on the choice of someone or something. I go along with Jane. Tom would be a good treasurer. Sharon will probably go along with chocolate. Everyone likes chocolate!
4. Fig. to play along with someone or something; to pretend that you are party to someone's scheme. I went along with the gag for a while.
See also: go
References in periodicals archive ?
He isn't just going to go along with something he doesn't believe in, he won't be that "yes man." Steve will have a strong voice in our community!
it's your prerogative to have what you want rather than go along with something you no longer believe in.
"Tell me about a time when you succeeded in getting someone to go along with something he or she was originally opposed to doing.
(Telegraph, June 21) How typical of the "if you can't bet them join them" attitude of the so-called socialists who would rather go along with something they disagree with, than risk losing an outright vote.
If a peer wants you to go along with something you know is wrong, say no in a tactful way and state your concerns about it without blame.
But the bravery it takes to buck a trend, to refuse to go along with something everyone else is doing, even if that means having to blow the whistle on it, is much harder to appreciate.
* When you disagree with her or won't go along with something she wants to do, she's completely inflexible and unwilling to compromise.
"I believe if they do understand, they'll go along with something very much like what the governor has proposed for long-term fixes."