go along with (someone or something)

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go along with (someone or something)

1. To follow along with someone or something; to act in accordance with another's actions, especially when their motive or goal is unknown. If the cops show up at the house because the party's too loud, just go along with whatever I say. I'm going to play a prank on Jenny when she walks in. Just go along with it, OK?
2. To accompany or join someone. Can I go along with you to the mall? I need to get a new alarm clock.
3. To participate or cooperate in an activity or scheme. I'm sorry, but I can't go along with this. It's wrong.
4. To be in harmony or agreement with something. Unfortunately, the information we learned does not go along with the doctor's claims.
See also: go

go along with someone or something

 
1. Lit. to travel along with someone or something. Dorothy went along with the scarecrow for a while until they met a lion.
2. Fig. to agree with someone or agree to something. I will go along with you on that matter. I will go along with Sharon's decision, of course.
3. Fig. to consent on the choice of someone or something. I go along with Jane. Tom would be a good treasurer. Sharon will probably go along with chocolate. Everyone likes chocolate!
4. Fig. to play along with someone or something; to pretend that you are party to someone's scheme. I went along with the gag for a while.
See also: go
References in periodicals archive ?
"I'm sure there will be lots of kids now getting the chance to go along with someone to see all the different sporting events.
'Also if midwives think they are going into an uncomfortable situation they would go along with someone else, sometimes the police will go with them or they would be advised not to go.'
A "team player" able to get along and go along with someone else's program is most prized.
WHY would you want to go along with someone who until now has been public enemy No1?
"They can go along with someone and point out where they buried a body.