go against

(redirected from go against someone)

go against (someone or something)

1. To oppose, disagree with, or compete against someone or something. I can't take money from a charity like that, it goes against all of my core principles. You'll be going against a state champion in the next match, so you'll have to give it everything you've got!
2. To be or signal a disadvantage or undesired outcome for someone or something. The senator's uncouth comments are certain to go against him in his re-election campaign. Though we thought we had an airtight legal argument, but the court case ultimately went against us.

go against

Oppose, be in conflict with, as in Does this legislation go against their best interest? [c. 1600] Also see against the grain.

go against

v.
1. To oppose or be in conflict with something, especially a directive or a set of beliefs: Telling such lies goes against my religious beliefs. They went against their lawyers' recommendations, and now they're in jail.
2. To decide someone or something is wrong or guilty, especially in a court of law: This case finally went against the defendants, and they had to pay a fine.
References in periodicals archive ?
It really wouldn't be good form to go against someone else's culture, would it?
I don't know if that's a fair characterization, but it does not bother me to go against someone who might be considered very powerful and very political or perhaps very wealthy.