glutton

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a glutton for punishment

A person who continues to do things whose consequences they find difficult or unpleasant. I couldn't wait to finish college, but I soon found myself in grad school. I must be a glutton for punishment. Why does George keep getting detention? Is he a glutton for punishment?
See also: for, glutton, punishment
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

glutton for punishment

Fig. someone who is eager for a burden or some sort of difficulty; someone willing to accept a difficult task. Tom works too hard. He is a glutton for punishment. I enjoy managing difficult projects, but I am a glutton for punishment.
See also: for, glutton, punishment
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

glutton for punishment

Someone who habitually takes on burdensome or unpleasant tasks or unreasonable amounts of work. For example, Rose agreed to organize the church fair for the third year in a row-she's a glutton for punishment . This expression originated as a glutton for work in the late 1800s, punishment being substituted about a century later.
See also: for, glutton, punishment
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a glutton for punishment

If someone is a glutton for punishment, they keep on doing something which most people would find unpleasant or difficult. As well as the early starts riding and late nights working, this glutton for punishment is also studying for a degree. I know it's a big job to take on, but then I've always been a glutton for punishment. Note: A glutton is a greedy person.
See also: for, glutton, punishment
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

a glutton for punishment

a person who is always eager to undertake hard or unpleasant tasks.
Glutton of — was used figuratively from the early 18th century for someone inordinately fond of the thing specified, especially when translating the Latin phrase helluo librorum ‘a glutton of books’. The possible origin of the present phrase is in early 19th-century sporting slang.
See also: for, glutton, punishment
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a ˌglutton for ˈpunishment, ˈwork, etc.

(informal) a person who seems to like doing unpleasant or difficult things: You’re going to drive all the way to London and back in a day? You’re a glutton for punishment, aren’t you?She’s a glutton for work. She stays late every evening.
A glutton is a person who is too fond of food. In this idiom, it refers to a person who seems to be very fond of the thing mentioned.
See also: for, glutton
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

glutton for punishment, a

A masochist, a person who seeks out odious or onerous tasks, or habitually takes on more than is reasonable. The earliest version of this term was a glutton for work and dates from the latter part of the nineteenth century. It was used by Kipling in his story A Day’s Work (1895): “He’s honest, and a glutton for work.” Whether work is viewed as punishment or not is clearly up to the viewer. The OED, which cites a glutton for punishment only in 1971, makes no such judgment.
See also: for, glutton
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, the pharmaceutical industry is hard at work at developing drugs that allow people to eat gluttonously without getting fat.
In fact the same viciousness that in fifty years has torn up entirely the gentle relation between town and country that had grown so naturally from Pizarro's grid - that has gluttonously devoured all the arable land that led him to choose the site of his capital - is now on the verge of extending its chaotic mantle of concrete and bustle to the lovely frame of cliffs and beaches.
Having been introduced around, offered a dozen smiles, handshakes, and hugs, we were shown the way to a gluttonously over-stuffed refrigerator and a bounteously laden kitchen table and told to have a second helping, to be certain we had something for the ride back over the bridge tonight or for the ride back into Brooklyn tomorrow morning.
Peter, however, prefers to give the appearance of "addressing himself seriously, not gluttonously, to dinner" (242), for which the Morrises respect him: "They liked him, he felt." Moreover, "they felt he counted on their support .
Woman is vampire, she eats and drinks him; her organ feeds gluttonously upon his.
she offers us dessert, and we savor it as gluttonously as we would a seductive tiramisu at the end of a mediocre repast.
And when I received news of his death, one of the images that came to my mind was seeing him in one of those patisseries, gluttonously thrusting a large quantity of cream, sugar and pastry into his mouth, almost as though his body were driving him to make up some obscure chemical deficiency, and I have often wondered whether, instead of some mental state, it was not some physical state, obscure but subtly malignant, the body constantly making its insatiable demand, that drove him to his terrible end."
Moreover, of Ashbery's collection Three Poems, Molesworth notes that "no reviewer of this work has had the temerity to suggest it was a goodnatured hoax, a jeux d'esprit in which the confessional impulses of contemporary poetry were so gluttonously satisfied that they were simultaneously being scorned.
Thus, using evidence of contemporary reactions to the Black Death in the medieval western and Mediterranean world, Yves Renouard has observed a similar pattern of people "giving themselves over to sensual pleasures, free of care", and abandoning themselves to "debauchery, gluttonously satisfying all their appetites".