gloss

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Related to glossed: glossed over

gloss over (something)

1. To minimize or omit something in an account in order to obscure, conceal, or diminish the importance of it. When I told Mom and Dad about my night, I just glossed over the fact that I'd gotten a parking ticket. You can tell they're trying to gloss over the poor Q3 sales in their investors' earnings report.
2. To give only superficial or perfunctory attention to something. I don't understand why this class glosses over such an important part of Medieval history.
See also: gloss, over

lip gloss

An exaggeration, misrepresentation, or distortion of reality, especially to make it seem happier, more innocent, or more carefree. Popular culture has taught young women that they will be happy so long as they find the right man to take care of this, but we all ought to know by now that that is just lip gloss smeared on emotional manipulation.
See also: gloss, lip

put a gloss on (something)

To make something appear more positive, acceptable, or palatable than it really is. They're putting a gloss on their poor sales figures by claiming that December sales will more than make up the difference. Stop putting a gloss on the failure, Jim—let's just move on.
See also: gloss, on, put
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

gloss over something

to cover up, minimize, or play down something bad. Don't gloss over your own role in this fiasco! I don't want to gloss this matter over, but it really isn't very important, is it?
See also: gloss, over
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gloss over

Make attractive or acceptable by deception or superficial treatment. For example, His resumé glossed over his lack of experience, or She tried to gloss over the mistake by insisting it would make no difference. [Mid-1600s]
See also: gloss, over
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

put a gloss on something

If you put a gloss on a difficult situation, you describe it in a way that makes it seem better than it really is. He obviously tried to put a gloss on the poor sales figures. Yesterday they tried to put a gloss on the Home Office statistics by stressing that recorded crime had stabilised. Note: A gloss is an explanation that is added to a book or other text in order to explain an unfamiliar term. The idea here is that the explanation being given is a misleading one.
See also: gloss, on, put, something
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

lip gloss

n. lies; deception; exaggeration; BS. (From the name of a lipstick-like cosmetic.) Everything he says is just lip gloss. He is a liar at heart.
See also: gloss, lip
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ad e) Here, the survey confirmed the expectation (based on pedagogical experience) that learner glosses are usually placed either in the margin or directly above the glossed word.
On subsequent reading the text that is glossed in L1 the reader's (i.e.
Dodwell, that the Paris manuscript is likely to have been copied directly from the Eadwine Psalter.(3) Rather than the more comprehensible type of sporadic gloss, which is to difficult words or to offer alternative interpretations, these glosses are connected groups, in that a line or two of the Roman psalter in the manuscript is glossed completely.
The Bevington edition, on the whole, seems in fact to be the most fully glossed, spotting difficulties that the other editions ignore, as in "Be it lawful I take up what's cast away" (King of France in King Lear, 1.1.257), explained "if it be"; the other two editions have no note on this subjunctive.
The play Sejanus (1605) was similarly heavily glossed; but in the 1616 Works its glosses, unlike those of the masques, were eliminated.