glom onto (someone or something)

(redirected from glommed onto)

glom onto (someone or something)

1. To cling to someone or something. I was horrified to see that several leeches had glommed onto me. My four-year-old always gloms onto my arm whenever we go into a new place together.
2. To remain persistently or desperately in someone else's company. My annoying little brother always gloms onto me and my friends whenever we're hanging out together. I wasn't close with them in high school, but they were the only people I knew in the university, so I decided to glom onto their group until I made some new friends of my own.
3. To focus one's interest or attention on someone or something. Mainstream news outlets have glommed onto the story of the young child raised by wolves.
4. To come to realize or understand something. It took me a while to glom onto what they were all talking about. The CEO finally glommed onto the fact that Margaret had been stealing from the company.
See also: glom
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This will disappoint many and I am not sure why lay involvement was not made mandatory It could be that the Vatican is rightly spooked by American lay leaders of the Raymond Arroyo, Tim Busch, John Garvey and George Weigel variety, men who have glommed onto the issue as part of a more general critique of this papacy, and suiting proposals for reform to their ideological measurements.
The two-time Oscar winner says he's "very suspicious of a movement that gets glommed onto in great stridency and rage and without nuance."
Somewhere in their classes, before studies became propaganda, they might have glommed onto the fact that the use of fossil fuels largely made possible the Industrial Revolution.
"We glommed onto this idea of 'the public,' because our work is interested in what's happening at a societal level but also what's going on in the upper echelons of bureaucracy and power.
Similarly, when the multi-channel TV industry glommed onto the term, the definition shifted slightly to mean "video that is delivered to consumers without going through the set-top box".
The media landscape has realigned itself with lightning speed to the power of data, After a century of being limited by "brute force media," marketers quickly glommed onto the vast potential of digital and addressable audiences,
Some members of the trade class have glommed onto them; others have yet to do so.
Many critics glommed onto new shows with "Comedy's back" abandon, enthusing over half-hours like "Enlisted," "The Crazy Ones," "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" and "About a Boy."
Once reporters and commentators smelled controversy, they glommed onto the movie, hoping for a media bonanza.
Overeager headline writers glommed onto the data points and made it sound as if these numbers pointed to some sort of impending brown supremacy -- ''As Demographics Change, So Does the Menu.''
What's more, he explains that if you base your design on man-made objects (think, for example, of the predilection to go down the road of "What would Apple do?"), "you will always be late." (Of course, basing your pallet on something that's some 70 million years old may make you au courant, assuming that some other people having already glommed onto the idea.)
We all [a while back] glommed onto the concept of [it being] "Google's version of Facebook," and focused only on comparing the similarities and differences between the two (such as number of users it had, whether "Circles" are "good," and how "hangouts" are weird).
As elsewhere, newspapers in the UK have glommed onto scandals involving gay politicians, but someone who is openly gay tends to be characterized less negatively than one caught in such a scandal who denies being gay.
In Tehran, politicians and the media glommed onto that remark as if it were the major outcome of the meeting.
The former pizza chain CEO presumably knows as much about finance as my mother, yet in his quest for the Republican presidential nomination, he has glommed onto yet another simplistic variation of the flat tax idea, in which everyone, no matter how rich or poor, would pay the same percentage of his income.