glean from (something)

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glean from (something)

1. To take that which has been left behind, usually grain remaining after a harvest. A noun or pronoun can be used between "glean" and "from." How much grain were you able to glean from the fields today?
2. To learn something from a particular source, often secondhand or piecemeal. A noun or pronoun can be used between "glean" and "from." I missed the meeting yesterday, so tell me what you were able to glean from his presentation. What have you been able to glean from the rumors going around?
See also: glean

glean something from something

 
1. Lit. to gather the leftovers of something from something; to gather the ears of grain left in a field after a harvest. The poor people gleaned their entire living from what was left in the fields. We will have to go out and glean something from the fields.
2. and glean something from someone Fig. to figure something out from bits of gossip. I was able to glean some important news from Tommy. Tell me the news you gleaned from the people in town.
See also: glean

glean from

v.
1. To learn something or figure something out using some information gathered bit by bit: We were able to glean information about their past from the conversation we overheard. I gleaned from these various articles that there was serious trouble brewing in the government.
2. To gather grain left behind by reapers: The farmers have gleaned their final harvests from their fields of wheat.
See also: glean