glaze over

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glaze over

1. To coat something with a glaze. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "glaze" and "over." After we take the cake out of the oven, we'll glaze it over.
2. To become covered in something that is shiny and resembles a glaze, often ice. It looks like the street glazed over last night, so be careful out there.
3. To begin to look lifeless or dull. Typically used to describe someone's eyes. Your eyes have glazed over—did you work another 18-hour shift today? The lecture was so boring that everyone's eyes started glazing over about halfway through.
See also: glaze, over

glazed over

Very intoxicated. Do you remember last night at the bar at all? You were glazed over.
See also: glaze, over
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

glaze over

 
1. Lit. [for something] to be covered over with a coat of something cloudy or ice. The roads glazed over and became very dangerous. The street is glazed over badly.
2. Fig. [for one's eyes] to assume a dull, bored appearance, signifying an inability to concentrate or a lack of sleep. My eyes glaze over when I hear all those statistics.
See also: glaze, over
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

glaze over

v.
1. To cover the surface of something with a glaze or similar substance: We glazed the cake over with chocolate frosting. The pastry chef glazed over doughnuts with hazelnut creme. The road was dangerously glazed over with frost.
2. To come to appear expressionless or lifeless: Her eyes glazed over when we talked about her last book. His expression always glazes over when he gets bored.
See also: glaze, over
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

glazed over

verb
See also: glaze, over
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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