glass ceiling

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glass ceiling

The systemic discrimination (likened to a physical barrier) against certain groups in the workplace, especially women, that prevents them from advancing. Many people believe that a glass ceiling exists within the tech industry because not many women hold prominent positions in the field.
See also: ceiling, glass
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

glass ceiling

An unacknowledged discriminatory barrier to advancement, especially for women and minorities. For example, Harriet knew she'd never be promoted-she would never get through the glass ceiling. [1980s]
See also: ceiling, glass
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

the glass ceiling

COMMON If you talk about the glass ceiling, you mean the opinions and attitudes which prevent people, especially women, from being given the most important jobs. At the age of 43 she became the highest ranking woman officer in the country, only to find she'd hit the glass ceiling. A woman judge has at last succeeded in breaking through the glass ceiling into the Court of Appeal, the second highest court in the land.
See also: ceiling, glass
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

glass ceiling

An invisible barrier to promotion. This term was born in the women’s movement of the 1970s, when it became clear that in many organizations and businesses discrimination barred women and minorities from advancing beyond a certain point. It is well on its way to clichédom.
See also: ceiling, glass
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
The term 'glass ceiling' represents the hidden barriers that obstruct women and minorities from climbing the corporate ladder to acquire leadership and senior management positions (Chow & Crawford, 2004; Ryan, Haslam, & Postmes, 2007).
Al-Manasra (2013) argues that, despite the fact that the UAE government has initiated fundamental steps to encourage women to advance their careers to leadership and top management positions, the glass ceiling based on gender bias remains the most challenging problem women face in their professional lives.
The glass ceilings that now seem to affect us are around the stakeholdership we have and the ability to participate in an increasingly technological society.
GLASS ceiling, until recently, was a term referring to the career limitations women experience through either general devaluation of females in the workplace or the limiting effects of childcare and other factors upon careers.
See also Randy Albelda and Chris Tilly, "Glass Ceilings and Bottomless Pits: Women's Work, Women's Poverty," Sojourner: The Women's Forum, Vol 22, No 12, Aug 97, [Online] Available: http://www.sojourner.org/archive/toc0897.html, 26 Aug 00.
Since the term was popularized in the 1980s, the glass ceiling has become a significant concept in the American workplace.
Department of Labor in A Report on the Glass Ceiling Initiative, which describes the results of an investigation of nine large U.S.
Thwarted by the additional hurdle of a now cemented-over glass ceiling, black MBAs have been humbled, learning not to believe the hype formerly associated with their degree.
Which leads me to propose that if there are glass ceilings, there are also glass floors, meaning for women to go up a hierarchy, they have to tread slowly, carefully, even quietly.
There is therefore need for existing leaders in denominational churches and religious institutions to provide supportive leadership behavior to women serving in different leadership positions to break the glass ceiling. By supportive leadership behavior, I mean behavior that gives respect to women and allows them an opportunity to lead; and allows them to rise to the top in denominational and religious institutions.
However, regardless of promising equal employment opportunity policies, women employees are often knocked down on the imperceptible, but inextricably institutionalised and repressive, transparent barricades, which is technically called the glass ceiling. Hence, this phenomenon in organisational settings implicitly conveys that the opportunity to get promoted to higher echelons in the corridors of organisational power and authority is not as easy as that of being absorbed into organisational fraternity.
The term 'glass ceiling' was first coined in the mid-1980s to characterise an artificial upper limit on women' s careers.
Firstly, the so-called "glass ceiling" in the workplace.
The glass ceiling is a lot thinner than it was in 1969 when I began my career as an educator.
THE GLASS CEILING IS DEFINED AS "THOSE ARTIFICIAL barriers based on attitudinal or organizational bias that prevent qualified individuals from advancing upward in their organization into management level positions." (1) Despite the large number of physicians in the United States (approximately 700,000), only about 2 percent identify administration as their primary professional activity.