glare


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

glare at (someone or something)

To look at someone or something with anger. Vivian always used to glare at me, so I thought for sure she didn't like me. Glaring at that parking ticket won't make it go away, you know.
See also: glare

glare down

1. To shine or glow powerfully on someone or something. I hope you put on sunscreen, considering how the sun is glaring down on us today.
2. To look someone with intensity so that they yield or submit. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "glare" and "down." That woman kept glaring me down until I gave her the last cherry pie, even though I'd picked it up first.
3. To look at someone or something with anger or disappointment. Glaring down at that parking ticket won't make it go away, you know.
See also: down, glare

glare down on (someone or something)

1. To shine or glow powerfully on someone or something. I hope you put on sunscreen, considering how the sun is glaring down on us today.
2. To look at someone or something with anger or disappointment. Glaring down on that parking ticket won't make it go away, you know. What are you glaring down on me for? I'm not the one who said it!
See also: down, glare, on

rivet (one's) glare on (someone or something)

To focus one's angry gaze or attention completely and continuously (on someone or something). Oh no, she's still mad at me—she riveted her glare on me as soon as I got here. I saw that the boss was riveting his glare on the sales figures I had put up on the white board.
See also: glare, on, rivet

glare at someone or something

to scowl at someone or something. Don't glare at me! I glared at the cat and thought mean thoughts.
See also: glare

glare down on someone or something

 
1. [for someone] to scowl down at someone or something. The judge glared down on the accused. I glared down on the cat, which ignored me, as usual.
2. [for the sun] to burn down brightly on someone or something. The sun glared down on the beach and made the sand hot to the touch. The bright sun glared down on the desert rocks.
See also: down, glare, on

rivet one's gaze on someone or something

 and rivet one's glare on someone or something
Fig. to fasten one's gaze onto someone or something. (As if it were attached by rivets.) He riveted his gaze on the surly young man. Walter riveted his hateful glare on the last page of the contract and sneered.
See also: gaze, on, rivet

glare down

v.
1. To shine on or illuminate someone or something strongly from above: The sun glared down on the nomads crossing the desert.
2. To intimidate someone or cause someone to submit by staring: The lawyer glared me down until I was unable to speak.
3. To look directly at someone or something disapprovingly or disappointedly: I glared down on my dog, whom I'd caught chewing on the curtains. The dog glared down at the bone, which had sunk to the bottom of the swimming pool.
See also: down, glare
References in periodicals archive ?
He said that while tinted, or "polarized," lenses can help shield against daytime glare, night vision is different.
That explains why not every car headlight appears to be dazzling, with eight-in-10 drivers saying only some cause glare.
To test the effectiveness of the Saturn, NIOSH conducted a scientific study on the detection of trip hazards and glare using the traditional roof bolter lighting and the Saturn light mounted on a walk-thru roof bolter.
"Far too often, we see large expanses of glass with little ability to control the distribution of daylight or eliminate the glare associated with direct sunlight penetration," Holtz explains.
The supplementation continued for one year, with measurements of macular pigment optical density, photostress recovery, and disability glare made at baseline (before supplementation), and at 6 and 12 months.
Unfortunately, defining the metrics for discomfort glare has been a source of disagreement between the IES and the European CIE, because, as the Handbook points out: "the cause of discomfort is not well understood" and "all (systems) give reasonable predictions for average discomfort for a group of people, but only poor predictions for an individual's response."
Use blinds or drapes to control the light from windows: Avoid veiling glare that is caused by direct light shining on the monitor screen, washing out the images.
Polarized lenses have long been the conventional solution to glare problems, but can add complications of their own, particularly when they make it difficult to see equipment dashboards, digital readouts, cellphone screens and other types of LED or LCD panels.
Fully shielded light fixtures are covered on all sides and direct the light through a single focal point, thereby preventing excessive lighting that produced distracting and wasteful glare. Glare can produce night blindness in drivers and can be hazardous to people and animals.
InTec Industries' SAFEMARK Anti-Glare face shields and shield-mask combination product lines now offer shields that will significantly reduce the glare caused by a reflection of light on a surface.
When sunglasses feature polarized lenses, they block hazardous glare, which not only causes eye strain but also can inhibit a person's ability to see clearly during such activities as driving.
ROAD accident statistics released recently, suggest that the North West has more road traffic accidents than anywhere else in the country attributed to glare from the sun.
UVEX says the issue of glare in the workplace is often under-estimated, but glare can be very disabling and even dangerous.
"By the Red Glare" takes us into the lives of representative citizens--black and white, men and women, Confederates and Unionists, civilians and combatants, freed and shackled, sane and insane--on the eve of historic destruction.