give (full) vent to (something)

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give (full) vent to (something)

To passionately express one's negative emotion, such as anger, frustration, etc. Once we left the office, Sally gave vent to her anger about how promotions are unfairly awarded in our department. I work in customer service, so I'm used to people giving full vent to their frustration.
See also: give, vent
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

give vent to something

Fig. to express anger. (The something is usually anger, ire, irritation, etc.) John gave vent to his anger by yelling at Sally. Bill couldn't give vent to his frustration because he had been warned to keep quiet.
See also: give, vent
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

give vent to

Express an emotion, as in He didn't dare give vent to his annoyance in front of her parents. [Late 1500s]
See also: give, vent
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

give vent to

express or release (a strong emotion, energy, etc.).
See also: give, vent
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

give (full) ˈvent to something

(informal) express a strong negative feeling freely and forcefully: I tried to stop myself giving full vent to my anger.
See also: give, something, vent
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hope has remarkable theatrical adrenaline, which is a prerequisite for giving full vent to Anne's larger than life emotions.
The songs are generally meaner and leaner than on its unremarkable predecessor Mojo, giving full vent to the garage, psych and blues bedrocks that are Petty staples.
By the time the final whistle blew at Ibrox on Boxing Day they were hanging over the front row of the stand directly behind the press area and giving full vent to their feelings.
Yet parents often discourage children from giving full vent to their youthful imaginations.
And if he sometimes seems to be holding back--his rendition of "Ain't Misbehavin'," while certainly enthusiastic, still seems oddly restrained'--at others he is clearly giving full vent to both his feelings and his virtuosity, the charmingly over-the-top first solo on "Georgia on My Mind" being a prime example of the latter.
I don't think a Merseyside audience would have been prevented from giving full vent to their feelings.
The Liberal Democrats, on the other hand, were giving full vent to a phenomenon perhaps best described as optimistic folly.
A performance of Ravel's song cycle Sheherazade occurred (that's about all), followed by music director Vasily Petrenko giving full vent to a rollicking Russian impassioned reading of Rachmaninov's Symphonic Dances.
A large TV audience saw a close-up of Strachan giving full vent to his feelings after Motherwell's injury-time equaliser at Fir Park on Saturday, as he took an angry swipe at the fourth official's electronic board.
Jankel always had jazz tendencies, and now he's giving full vent to them.
We are, I mused to myself, the intestinal equivalent of Simon and Garfunkel giving full vent to A Had not off
This early album is extremely muscular, the tenor man giving full vent to his passions and showing off a monster technical ability.
Among the Quakers was Plaid pin-up Helen Mary Jones, who was pictured giving full vent to her vocal chords.
Yet such changes allow Mr Darling's opponents to create the impression that he is anti-business: that he is giving full vent to those tax and spend instincts.
But it clearly had no effect as the Manc boys celebrated their win in familiar fashion giving full vent to their foul-mouthed vocabulary.