give rise to (something)

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give rise to (something)

To trigger or cause the genesis or growth of something. The technological advances gave rise to the Industrial Revolution. If left untreated, the infection can give rise to a number of other complications.
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Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

give rise to something

to cause something; to instigate something. The attack gave rise to endless arguments. Her ludicrous living gave rise to further speculation as to the source of her money.
See also: give, rise, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

give rise to

be the cause of.
See also: give, rise, to
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

give ˈrise to something

(formal) cause something to happen or exist: The novel’s success gave rise to a number of sequels.
See also: give, rise, something, to
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

give rise to

To be the cause or origin of; bring about.
See also: give, rise, to
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
The geological formation of that portion of the American Union, which lies between the Alleghanies and the Rocky Mountains, has given rise to many ingenious theories.
We left Don Quixote wrapped up in the reflections which the music of the enamourned maid Altisidora had given rise to. He went to bed with them, and just like fleas they would not let him sleep or get a moment's rest, and the broken stitches of his stockings helped them.
We must now explain the cause of this gentleman's long absence, which had given rise to such gloomy and dispiriting surmises.
And what is the fundamental doctrine which has given rise to so much bitterness and aversion?--Merely this: that the sexes are at bottom ANTAGONISTIC--that is to say, as different as blue is from yellow, and that the best possible means of rearing anything approaching a desirable race is to preserve and to foster this profound hostility.
I do believe that it is the possession of this other-personality--but not so strong a one as mine--that has in some few others given rise to belief in personal reincarnation experiences.
In each genus, the species, which are already extremely different in character, will generally tend to produce the greatest number of modified descendants; for these will have the best chance of filling new and widely different places in the polity of nature: hence in the diagram I have chosen the extreme species (A), and the nearly extreme species (I), as those which have largely varied, and have given rise to new varieties and species.
A taxpayer is not required to recognize taxable income for the discharge of a liability when payment of the liability would have given rise to a tax deduction.
kissing the hand and forehead of a Kuwaiti fan has given rise to controversy
However, imports surged by as much as 32.2 per cent to $ 29.7 billion during the month giving rise to a huge trade deficit of $ 13.06 billion, which has given rise to some concern.
Since then, the process of mapping the great expanse of an expanding universe has given rise to numerous new discoveries, leading to the emergence of the now popular Big Bang model of creation.
It is these market principles that have also given rise to the explosion of adjunct teaching, which may effectively undermine the tenure system in many colleges and universities.
He examines, among other ideas, how the experience of fear may have given rise to religion, Western societies' indulgence of rage versus Eastern cultures' suppression of it, and how the subtle difference between envy and jealousy affects monogamy.
Historically, the challenge posed by building in such climatic extremes, whether the desert or the tropics, has often given rise to some of the most inventive vernacular architecture that strives to work in harmony with the natural world.
These ideas have given rise to an international community of people at work in more than 70 countries in programmes which include reconciliation; tackling the root causes of corruption, poverty and social exclusion; and strengthening the moral and spiritual foundations for democracy.