give or take


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give or take

1. Approximately. The phrase is used to suggest that the exact number may be above or below the estimated amount. There were maybe 20 people there, give or take.
2. Aside from. Give or take the occasional argument, my sister and I get along pretty well.
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give or take

Plus or minus a small amount, approximately, more or less. For example, We have ten acres of land, give or take a bit, or It should take a couple of hours, give or take. [Mid-1900s]
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give or take

COMMON
1. You use give or take to show that a number, especially a large number, is approximate. The structure is thought to be around two thousand years old, give or take a decade or so. It takes about five hours to get there, give or take.
2. Give or take is also used to mean `apart from'. We're in Manchester, not Sydney, though on a sunny day the two cities do have a similar feel to them, give or take the odd beach, bridge, harbour and opera house. Note: You often use this expression humorously to suggest that two things are actually very different.
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give or take —

to within — (used to express the degree or accuracy of a figure). informal
1991 Biyi Bandele-Thomas The Man who Came in from the Back of Beyond Aged twenty-five give or take a few years, he spoke in a detached voice, like a judge passing the death sentence.
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give or ˈtake (something)

if something is correct give or take a particular amount, it is approximately correct: It took us three hours, give or take a few minutes.It’ll cost about $1 000, give or take.
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give or take

Plus or minus a small specified amount: The chalet is close to the road, give or take a few hundred yards.
See also: give, take