give (one) food for thought

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give (one) food for thought

To give one something to consider. That meeting really gave me food for thought—I might invest in their company after all.
See also: food, give, thought
References in periodicals archive ?
SALFORD City playmaker Danny Lloyd hopes his impressive cameo versus Leeds United will give food for thought for manager Graham Alexander.
A charity scheme from a former nuclear power station near Annan is helping a local organisation give food for thought.
Even for the most die-hard vaccine advocates, those who put their full faith in FDA honesty, this story should give food for thought and I hope concern.
This fact alone should give food for thought for anyone using Kaspersky anti-virus or any other software," he said.
Getting together with likeminded people and exchanging ideas will give food for thought. Plans for the future are discussed.
Future Conditional is packed with thrills and spills, sometimes a little too ruthlessly set up, and makes enough fresh political points to give food for thought, even to a recently departed leader of a major political party.
There are happy ones, sad ones and funny ones, and I hope they give food for thought and provide some inspiration to those reading them.
4 Give food for thought. Providing children with a nutritious diet feeds their brains as well as their tummies - and that's never more important than at exam time.
You will have to work to encourage this book off the library shelves, but do put in the spadework because Bluefish is multi-layered and will give food for thought beyond the main storyline to young teenage readers.
"It does, however, give food for thought about the importance of genetics for sperm motility and may open the way to more studies in this area," he added.
These make fascinating reading and give food for thought when teaching other subjects.
The quality of the contributions is somewhat uneven, but the better ones certainly give food for thought. The problem of writing a truly global history without losing analytical coherence has been one of Sutherland's concerns, and essays by Peter Boomgaard and Willem van Schendel go in that direction.
Calling for readers to make their own decision, he offers his own opinion the matter, and hopes to give food for thought when deciding.
Although the "dust-to-dust" report is highly disputed, not least by Toyota, it does give food for thought about what the true overall impact of any product is in terms of the environment.
There are also many tales of cowardice, disloyalty and selfishness, which also give food for thought. St Luke relates the story of the spread of the Gospel with its ups and downs, its heroes and villains, warts and all.