give currency


Also found in: Legal.

give currency (to something)

To make something seem more credible or probable, perhaps by providing additional information or details. You're famous in this field—if you comment this guy's wacky notions, you'll just be giving currency to them. Ultimately, we need an expert to give currency to our findings.
See also: currency, give

give currency (to something)

to spread a story around. (With a negative if there is doubt about what is said.) I can't give any currency to anything Ralph Jones says. We give no currency to those stories. His actions gave currency to the rumor that he was about to leave.
See also: currency, give
References in periodicals archive ?
Everyone agrees that it is licit to practice the fourth type of exchange, by true transference, carried out by buying, bartering, or using another innominate contract to give currency that is worth less in one land than in another because it is not used there; because its metal is not worth as much there as in the other place; or because it is broken, disfigured, dented, worn out, or weightless and take it to the other land where it is worth more because it is not weighed there or because it is more used there.
Dettmar and Stephen Watt's collection Marketing Modernisms: Self-Promotion, Canonization, and Rereading (1996) and Lawrence Rainey's Institutions of Modernism: Literary Elites and Public Culture (1998) give currency to the notion that even authors most vocally opposed to mass culture marketed themselves and their work.
I am well aware that this solecism often occurs in common speech and even on BBC radio and television, but surely the television licensing authority should have known better than to give currency on an official document, sent to elderly people already confused by spin-doctors' semantics, professional jargon and the alternative definitions applied to time-honoured words, to this distortion of the English language.
Andy Higginbottom's review of When Memory Dies, published in the magazine Hot Spring, a publication highly supportive of the LTTE, claims that, in its last section, When Memory Dies `seems to veer towards a strained pacifism'.[11] Higginbottom's misrecognition of a politics of coexistence as `pacifism' suggests the extent of work to be done to give currency and cultural intelligibility to a non-absolutist politics.
If you don't report it you're not covering the news and, if you do, you give currency to these things that they really shouldn't have."