gig


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(one's) jig is up

One's plan or scheme has been discovered or thwarted; one's game, trick, or deception is at an end. A variant of the much more common phrase "the jig is up." Your jig is up, Senator Marten! Your tax evasion has been found out, and the police are here to escort you to prison. We were going to play a practical joke on David, but when he noticed our car parked out front, I knew that our jig was up. Our jig is up if they figure out how we manipulated the accounts.
See also: jig, up

gig

slang
1. noun A single or temporary professional job or engagement, especially something very brief. Often used in reference to the performance arts. Our band got a gig playing at a kid's birthday party next week. It's a little embarrassing, but it's better than nothing!
2. noun, military A demerit for a minor infraction, as of dress or deportment code. I can't believe I got a gig just because my shoe had a scuff mark on it.
3. noun A shortening of "gigabyte." The laptop boasts 32 gigs of RAM, meaning it can run several programs simultaneously without slowing down.
4. verb To work single or temporary professional jobs or engagements, especially those that are very brief. Often used in reference to the performance arts. My dream is to become the house DJ for a high-end club, but for now I just gig at corporate events.
5. verb, military To give a demerit for a minor infraction, as of dress or deportment code. Your CO will gig you if there's even a single wrinkle in your uniform.

gig economy

A labor market in which temporary or freelance work is common. A "gig" is a one-time job. After getting laid off from my full-time office job, I started doing freelance work, like many other people in the gig economy.
See also: economy, gig

gig line

A perfectly straight vertical line from the top collar button down to the bottom of the seam of the fly on one's trousers, along which the placket of one's shirt should be aligned. Originally a US military term. The drill instructor will have you doing pushups if your gig line is crooked. I always check that my fly is closed and my gig line is straight before going into a meeting.
See also: gig, line

side gig

A job or source of income one performs in addition to one's primary job. I've had a side gig as a freelance artist for a few years now. It's nice getting paid for what I love to do, though I don't know if I could earn enough to do it full-time. Almost all of the rookie reporters I know have some kind of side gig to help them supplement their income.
See also: gig, side

the jig is up

The plan or scheme has been discovered and/or thwarted; the game, trick, or deception is at an end. The jig is up, Smith! The police found your fingerprints all over the safe. We tried to smuggle a kitten into the house, but when mom saw me carrying a saucer of milk, I knew that the jig was up.
See also: jig, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2022 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

the jig is up

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
If the jig is up, someone can no longer do something wrong or illegal because someone has found out about it. They had been taking money from residents, but they knew the jig was up when one of them contacted the police. Compare with the game is up.
See also: jig, up
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

the jig is up

the scheme or deception is revealed or foiled. North American informal
The sense of jig here dates from the late 16th century and means ‘jest’ or ‘trick’. The jig is over is recorded from the late 18th century in the USA and the usual modern version with up appeared only slightly later.
See also: jig, up
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

gig

1. n. a onetime job; an engagement. (Musicians.) I had a gig out on the west side, but I couldn’t get there.
2. in. to play or perform. (Musicians.) I didn’t gig at all last week. I’m getting hungry for a job.
3. n. any job of an assignment nature; a onetime job such as when a newspaper reporter is assigned to write a particular story. I didn’t want that election gig, but I got it anyway.
4. n. a bother; an annoyance; a job. Man, this paperwork is such a gig.
5. n. a giggle; a bit of laughter. Her little story gave us all a good gig.

the jig is up

phr. the game is ended; the scheme has been found out. Okay, you kids. The jig’s up!
See also: jig, up
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Also, GiG will receive the payment in monthly instalments over the contract period of 48 months, starting seven months after this date.
And the reason is simple: going to a gig is just too complicated.
This will be the first-ever free mobile banking solution entirely focused on serving gig workers in the US.
Join BandClout now and start browsing musicians and gigs.
Since many people are able to work in part-time/freelance positions, gig economy services are often cheap and easy to reach.
While the gig economy has been spawned by technology such as Uber apps, the technology sector itself is a beneficiary as well.
Today, insurers aren't exactly rushing to transform their workers' comp approach for gig workers.
On Twitter, the former Rivermaya frontman said artists and managers have the responsibility to honor a commitment even if a bigger gig comes along.
when u confirm a gig, no matter how small, u have a responsibilty to HONOR ur commitment even if a another gig comes along later on.
He explained that the coverage is designed for gig and on-demand platforms, targeting workers including couriers, warehouse workers, restaurant/hospitality employees and medical personnel.
In the Philippine Airlines (PAL), an all female group of millennials has organized a gig every Thursday lunch.
GiG said Thursday it signed a contract with Hard Rock International, following a Letter of Intent signed on Oct.
They were set to play their first gig and decided they wanted a bass player for it.
Gigged: The End of the Job and the Future of Work tells of the "gig economy" and a new type of work Sarah Kessler first reported on years ago.