the gift of tongues

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Related to gift of tongues: speaking in tongues

the gift of tongues

The ability to speak foreign languages one has never learned, one of the miracles of the Holy Spirit. The Vatican is sending a team of priests fluent in over 30 languages to investigate whether a woman truly has the gift of tongues.
See also: gift, of, tongue

the gift of tongues

the power of speaking in unknown languages, regarded as one of the gifts of the Holy Spirit.
When the disciples of Jesus were filled with the Holy Spirit after Pentecost (Acts 2:1–4), the gift of tongues was one of the ways in which this phenomenon manifested itself; compare with speak in tongues (at speak).
See also: gift, of, tongue
References in periodicals archive ?
In the context of Bede's commentary, this is presented according to the traditional interpretation which sees the Pentecostal gift of tongues as a recovery of "Unitatem linguarum quam superbia Babylonis disperserat," [the unity of languages which the pride of Babylon shattered].
"The Influence of Anxiety: Prolegomena to a Study of the Production of Poetry by Women." A Gift of Tongues: Critical Challenges in Contemporary American Poetry.
Yet the Bible also provides a contrasting story - that of the Pentecost - in which the Holy Spirit infuses the disciples with knowledge and the gift of tongues. The curse of Babel is, in a sense, reversed.
Write out your homily: A great number of preachers feel that they have the gift of tongues from the Holy Spirit--while few do.
The three key language-related Bible passages (Gen 11.1-9 on the tower of Babel, Acts 2 on the beginning of the Eschaton, and 1Cor 14.6-12, where Paul writes on the gift of tongues) provide the biblical framework for Bibliander's views on language and theology (XXV).
He lifts up the late nineteenth-century Anglo-American "faith missions" that crossed confessional boundaries and nurtured expectations for a worldwide revival and the teachings of Charles Fox Parham regarding the missionary purpose of the gift of tongues as two important streams.
In her lead essay Edith Blumhofer tells how--in the wake of Azusa Street and similar, concurrent revivals one hundred years ago--early American Pentecostals were convinced that the gift of tongues was God's way of enabling them to preach the Gospel in the mother tongues of peoples all over the world, without the time-consuming labor of actually learning another language.
The Catholic, Heribert Muhlen called the gift of tongues in Pentecostalism a "substitute sacrament".
I had been told I might receive the gift of tongues, but I did not and I was glad.
Today's well-known passage on the body of Christ was triggered when some in the Corinthian community began to abuse the gifts the Spirit had given them, especially the gift of tongues. Paul has already stressed how each of the community's spiritual gifts is geared for the good of the whole community; now he zeroes in on the makeup of the community itself, employing the image of a human body.
(20.) Joseph Smale, "The Gift of Tongues," Living Truth, January 1907, p.
Rather than allowing the full variety of spiritual gifts to be experienced and used in the community, the gift of tongues had overtaken and pushed aside all other gifts.
He specifically referred to the notion that gospel preaching should be "attended by some remarkable signs corresponding to the tongues of fire upon the heads of the disciples, and accompanied with some unusual power of utterance like the gift of tongues." Though the article was originally written for an American audience, an editorial note added that "much of it applies also to India."(24)
And he begins this chapter by pointing out how the gift of tongues is actually dividing the community instead of being a Spirit-given help to benefit all its members.
[2] I shall also examine the frustrations over failure to acquire language proficiency, the appeal of the "gift of tongues" (glossolalia), criticisms of such expectations, and the legacy of this interest.