giddy

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from giddy-up to whoa

Rur. all the way from the beginning to the end. The road is paved from giddy-up to whoa. The play stinks. It is dull from giddy-up to whoa.
See also: whoa

Giddy up!

(ˈgɪdi...)
exclam. Move faster! (Properly said to a horse to start it moving. Also said to people or things as a joke.) Giddy up, Charlie! It’s time to start moving.
See also: giddy
References in periodicals archive ?
Avinash Bhondve, president of the Pune chapter of the Indian Medical Association said: Dehydration is a common problem at this time of the year, which could result in giddiness, fatigue and cramps.
Lat's pen-and-ink outlines of expressive characters and charming scenarios will please and interest readers, from the giddiness of his jolly, round father to the expressive way he draws the careful convalescence of 10-year-old boys after their traditional circumcision.
HEART-POUNDING ATTRACTION, intense all-night conversations--Aditi Brennan Kapil's Love Person captures the giddiness of new love affairs.
When that day comes -- and you wait for it with a combination of giddiness and fear -- ``Mafioso'' turns on a dime, mirth giving way to menace.
Yet at times his effervescence borders on giddiness, and his love for the Church on triumphalism.
The score is superb: Van Alkemade has constructed a soundtrack that marries techno to Delta blues-influenced slide guitar, with the effects ranging from unexpected melancholy to outright giddiness.
If insufficient fluid has been taken during exertion, the signs will be thirst and a dry mouth perhaps leading to giddiness and tingling fingers or toes.
But players could experience a feeling of light-headedness, giddiness and possibly even nausea.
Discontinue reading if any of the following occur: itching, aching, dizziness, ringing in ears, vomiting, giddiness, auditory or visual hallucinations, loss of balance, slurred speech, blindness, drowsiness, insomnia, profuse sweating, shivering, or heart palpitations.
This debut book weaves her overwhelming grief with the tingly giddiness of first love and the burgeoning lesbianism she finds at Our Lady of Mercy School for Girls.
Liberated from the pathos of modernity and the effusive giddiness of party culture, art could certainly have consequences once more.
99) notes tetrahydrocannabinol's (THC's) side effects of "sedation, giddiness, and paranoia" and then states that a new drug, AM1241, alleviates pain "without the side effects" of the marijuana ingredient.
Much of this writing was against the grain of earlier imperial and colonial studies, first the emphasis on politics and institutional histories and then, particularly in the 1960s and 1970s as the giddiness of decolonization turned into the postcolonial blues, a concentration on economic change and stagnation.
That "irrational exuberance" of the late '90s was, in fact, the giddiness of hypoglycemia induced by a diet of boutique muffins and $5-a-loaf "artisan bread.
If Vargas Llosa does not share the apparent naivete of his former socialist comrades-in-arms about the future of Latin America (and this despite the recent liberalization of many Latin American regimes in the 1980s and '90s), it is perhaps due to his conviction that the region has more than once before experienced the giddiness that comes with a seeming liberation from the weight of historically outmoded despotisms.